Your Store: LeichhardtWetherill ParkPenrithMerrylandsSt ClairWinston HillsMacarthur (Change)
13 000 TRIMS

Trim's Vegetables

Getting the most from your
fresh Vegetables

Brussel Sprouts

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Brussels sprouts are packed full of vitamin C. They are also full of vitamin D, folic acid, potassium and vitamin K.
SELECTING // Select brussel sprouts that are firm and slightly springy to the touch
STORING // Brussels sprouts are best kept in the fridge in a perforated plastic bag.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // : A chef's secret is to cut an 'X' in the bottom of the brussel sprout; this helps the core to cook quickly, meaning the entire brussel sprout will be tender and juicy when you eat it.

Cabbage

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Cabbages are packed with vitamin C, dietary fibre and folate.
SELECTING // Look for crisp, brightly coloured cabbages with a subtle sweet smell.
STORING // Store cabbages in a plastic bag in the crisper section of your refrigerator for three to four days.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Green cabbage has a refreshing flavour and crunchy texture, while red cabbage has thicker leaves and a slightly sweeter taste. They can both be substituted for one another in recipes.

Capsicum

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // By weight, green capsicums have twice as much vitamin C as citrus fruit. They are also a great source of vitamin B6, vitamin E, potassium and antioxidants.
SELECTING // Make sure the skin is firm, glossy and bright with no wrinkles, soft spots or blemishes.
STORING // Keep capsicums in the crisper section or in a sealed plastic bag in the fridge for up to 1 week.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Cut in half and remove the seeds and membrane. When preparing the smaller varieties, cut off the top and scoop out the seeds and membrane.

Carrots

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Carrots are an excellent source of vitamin A, a useful source of vitamin C and a good source of dietary fibre.
SELECTING // Select carrots with good colour and no signs of bending or limpness.
STORING // Store unwashed in and airtight plastic bag in the refrigerator crisper.
AVAILABLE AT // Wetherill Park,Leichhardt,Penrith
PREPARING // Wash in cold water, peel thinly or use unpeeled. Trim the top and tail. Use whole, sliced, diced, julienned or grated in casseroles, soups, salads or cakes.

Chillies

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Chillies are high in anti-oxidants and vitamin C.
SELECTING // Look for even-coloured chillies with taut skin.
STORING // Store in the crisper section or in a sealed plastic bag in the fridge for up to one week.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Wear gloves or wash hands thoroughly after chopping and deseeding chillies, as they can irritate your eyes and skin.

Garlic

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Garlic is a good source of dietary fibre. Garlic is valued for its medicinal qualities, particularly as an antiseptic and a cold/flu deterrent.
SELECTING // Select plump firm bulbs with no sign of bruising or decay.
STORING // Store with onions in a cool dark area. Garlic has a storage life of up to 6 months.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Remove clove from bulb and peel. Use whole, sliced, crushed or finely chopped.

Ginger

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // A good source of dietary fibre and vitamin B1.
SELECTING // Look for firm, fresh-looking ginger. It should be pale-brown in colour, with no wrinkled or soft patches
STORING // Store ginger in the crisper section of your fridge for up to two weeks. It can also be wrapped in plastic then frozen for up to 1 month – simply remove and grate as much as you need each time then return to the freezer.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Use a vegetable peeler or small sharp knife to peel away the skin, then chop, slice, grate or juice ginger. You can break a knob off then store the rest for later.

Kohlrabi

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Kohlrabi is an excellent source of vitamin C with some potassium and niacin.
SELECTING // Select smooth, rounded bulbs 8-15cm in diameter. Avoid soft or winkled produce.
STORING // Store in an airtight plastic bag in the refrigerator crisper.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Cut off the base and trim the stalks. Wash thoroughly, cook whole with skin left on. It can be steamed, boiled or microwaved. It can also be peeled and sliced or diced and used in soups or casseroles.

Leeks

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Leeks are a great source vitamin C, iron, folate and fibre.
SELECTING // Look for crisp-looking leeks, with pure white stems.
STORING // Leeks retain their moisture and aroma best when they are in a lightly wrapped plastic bag in the fridge.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Although the entire leek is edible, the tastiest part of the vegetable is the white stalk - the green leaves tend to be stronger and more pungent in taste.

Okra

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Okra are a good source of dietary fibre, vitamin C, iron, calcium, potassium and B6.
SELECTING // Select okra that are small in size and avoid any that are soft or have brown spots.
STORING // Store in a plastic bag in the fridge for up to 4 days.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Cut and discard tops and tails.

Onions

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Onions contain calcium, iron and potassium.
SELECTING // Select onions which are firm, well-shaped with small necks. Avoid spongy or sprouting onions with uneven or patchy skin colouring.
STORING // It's best to store onions in a cool, dry, dark, open space.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Try placing your onions in the fridge before preparing to reduce the sting when cutting. Peel and discard skin and slice flesh.

Parsnips

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Parsnips are an excellent source of vitamin C and a good source of dietary fibre and folic acid.
SELECTING // Select firm, well formed parsnips with smooth skin and no signs of softness.
STORING // Store in an air tight plastic bag in the refrigerator crisper and use as soon as possible.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Scrub well and trim top and root. Slice thinly, julienne, dice or grate. Serve with dips, use in baked dishes, soups and casseroles.

Peas

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Peas are an excellent source of vitamin C and a good source of vitamin B3, folate and beta carotene.
SELECTING // : Select green peas that are small to medium in size with waxy, plump, bright green pods. Choose bright, crisp snow peas and sugar snap peas. Smaller pods are generally the most tender.
STORING // Store us in a plastic storage bag in the crisper section of the refrigerator. Use within two to three days.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Remove peas from pods unless they’re very young and tender, then the pods can be cooked and eaten too. Slide thumb down pod to split it open from the stem end and remove peas from top to bottom.

Potatoes

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Potatoes are a good source of vitamin C, potassium and dietary fibre.
SELECTING // Select potatoes that have firm, dry skin.
STORING // Store in a cool, dry, dark and well-ventilated place.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Clean with a brush and cook with the skin on, but remove any green sections. If skins have to be removed, peel thinly with a vegetable peeler and cook as soon as peeled.

Radish

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Radish is a source of vitamin C.
SELECTING // Select radishes with smooth skin that are free from splits or brown patches.
STORING // Remove the leaves and store in the fridge for up to one week.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Trim off the leaves and the root, then wash in cool water. Slice as desired.

Silverbeets

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // A good source of dietary fibre, folic acid, and vitamin C. Contains vitamin B6 and riboflavin and is low in sodium.
SELECTING // Select silverbeet with fresh, dark green, crisp leaves and stalks. Avoid leaves that are wilted or scarred.
STORING // Cut off a large section of white stalk, and store stalks and leaves in an airtight plastic bag in the refrigerator crisper.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Trim and remove stalks. Wash leaves and slice. Use in stir-fries, steamed, pureed, combined in quiches, pies or filo parcels.

Spring Onion/Eschallots

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Spring onions are a good source of vitamin C and dietary fibre.
SELECTING // Select eschallots that are medium-sized with fresh looking green leaves that don’t droop too much.
STORING // Refrigerate unwashed, store in a plastic bag or wrap in plastic.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Strip away outside leaves and chop off root.

Squash

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Squash are a good source of vitamin C.
SELECTING // Make sure the squash have a glossy yellow colour and are firm to the touch.
STORING // Squash are best stored in an airtight plastic bag in the refrigerator crisper.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Simply wash and cook whole, sliced or cut into wedges.

Swede

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Swedes are an excellent source of vitamin C and a good source of dietary fibre.
SELECTING // Select well rounded, smooth skinned swedes. Check stem end for deterioration or softness.
STORING // Store swedes in a cool, slightly damp place out of direct sunlight. Unwashed swedes will keep for several months. Avoid putting the 'roots' in the fridge, but the greens will chill for a couple of days.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Wash and peel.

Sweet Potato

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Sweet Potato are an excellent source of vitamin C, a good source of complex carbohydrate, folic acid, vitamin E, potassium and dietary fibre when consumed with the skin on. Orange and yellow varieties are an excellent source of vitamin A.
SELECTING // Choose clean, smooth, well shaped sweet potato.
STORING // Store in a cool, dark, well ventilated place.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Wash and scrub. There is no need to peel.

Sweetcorn

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Corn is an excellent source of dietary fibre and a good source of of potassium.
SELECTING // Buy corn in its husk for freshness and the best flavour. Look for husks that are bright green with white silky threads.
STORING // Store in its husk in the fridge. Corn is best enjoyed within 2 days of purchasing.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Remove the husks and silk just before cooking. To remove the kernels, use a knife to cut down the length of the corn.

Tomatoes

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Tomatoes are high in vitamin C and vitamin A.
SELECTING // Pick tomatoes that are plump and heavy for their size. Also, make sure the tomatoes have a firm, shiny skin with no wrinkles or blemishes.
STORING // Tomatoes store well at room temperature but if you need to store them for longer, you can store them in your fridge.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // If stored in the fridge, bring to room temperature before slicing. Wash and eat all of the tomato except the stem.

Turnips

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Turnips are an excellent source of vitamin C and a good source of dietary fibre.
SELECTING // Select well-rounded, smooth skinned turnips. Check stem end for deterioration or softness.
STORING // Store in a cool, dark, well ventilated place. Can be stored in the refrigerator crisper.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Wash and peel. Small turnips can be used whole, but large ones should be cut into chunks.

Watercress

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Watercress are a good source of vitamin C and A, niacin, thiamine, riboflavin and iron.
SELECTING // Choose fresh looking bunches with green firm leaves and stalks.
STORING // Store for a few days in a plastic bag in the crisper section of the refrigerator. To refresh submerge in cold water for 10 minutes.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Tear leaves and use in salads and sandwiches. Use as a garnish with meat dishes.

Witlof

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Witlof is high in vitamin C, is a good source of protein, carbohydrates and potassium.
SELECTING // Look for tightly packed leaves with fresh tips.
STORING // Witlof is best stored away from light. Store in a brown paper bag in the crisper for up to two days.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // To reduce the bitterness, cut the harder inner part of the stem off before cooking.

Zucchini

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Zucchini is an excellent source of vitamin C.
SELECTING // Select firm zucchini with glossy skin.
STORING // Store in a sealed plastic bag in the crisper for up to three days.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Wash and pat dry with a towel. Remove both ends and prepare as desired.

Zucchini Flowers

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Zucchini flowers are a good source of vitamins A, C, E, and K.
SELECTING // Look for firm, fresh looking flowers that are only slightly open.
STORING // Use them the day you buy them.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Remove stamens, anthers and ovaries before cooking. Many recipes involve stuffing zucchini flowers.

Artichokes

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Artichokes are a good source of vitamin C and thiamine and contain some dietary fibre, calcium, phosphorus, niacin and potassium.
SELECTING // The size of an artichoke does not necessarily indicate quality. Select artichokes with tight, compact, heavy heads that yield slightly to pressure. Leaves should be a green, purple or bronze in colour. Avoid artichokes with opened out, curled or dry looking leaves.
STORING // Globe artichokes should be stored in an airtight plastic bag, in the refrigerator crisper. Store Jerusalem artichokes in a cool, dry place.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Artichokes can be added raw, whole, sliced or quartered to stews, casseroles and soups.

Brussel Sprouts

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Brussels sprouts are packed full of vitamin C. They are also full of vitamin D, folic acid, potassium and vitamin K.
SELECTING // Select brussel sprouts that are firm and slightly springy to the touch
STORING // Brussels sprouts are best kept in the fridge in a perforated plastic bag.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // : A chef's secret is to cut an 'X' in the bottom of the brussel sprout; this helps the core to cook quickly, meaning the entire brussel sprout will be tender and juicy when you eat it.

Cabbage

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Cabbages are packed with vitamin C, dietary fibre and folate.
SELECTING // Look for crisp, brightly coloured cabbages with a subtle sweet smell.
STORING // Store cabbages in a plastic bag in the crisper section of your refrigerator for three to four days.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Green cabbage has a refreshing flavour and crunchy texture, while red cabbage has thicker leaves and a slightly sweeter taste. They can both be substituted for one another in recipes.

Capsicum

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // By weight, green capsicums have twice as much vitamin C as citrus fruit. They are also a great source of vitamin B6, vitamin E, potassium and antioxidants.
SELECTING // Make sure the skin is firm, glossy and bright with no wrinkles, soft spots or blemishes.
STORING // Keep capsicums in the crisper section or in a sealed plastic bag in the fridge for up to 1 week.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Cut in half and remove the seeds and membrane. When preparing the smaller varieties, cut off the top and scoop out the seeds and membrane.

Carrots

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Carrots are an excellent source of vitamin A, a useful source of vitamin C and a good source of dietary fibre.
SELECTING // Select carrots with good colour and no signs of bending or limpness.
STORING // Store unwashed in and airtight plastic bag in the refrigerator crisper.
AVAILABLE AT // Wetherill Park,Leichhardt,Penrith
PREPARING // Wash in cold water, peel thinly or use unpeeled. Trim the top and tail. Use whole, sliced, diced, julienned or grated in casseroles, soups, salads or cakes.

Chillies

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Chillies are high in anti-oxidants and vitamin C.
SELECTING // Look for even-coloured chillies with taut skin.
STORING // Store in the crisper section or in a sealed plastic bag in the fridge for up to one week.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Wear gloves or wash hands thoroughly after chopping and deseeding chillies, as they can irritate your eyes and skin.

Garlic

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Garlic is a good source of dietary fibre. Garlic is valued for its medicinal qualities, particularly as an antiseptic and a cold/flu deterrent.
SELECTING // Select plump firm bulbs with no sign of bruising or decay.
STORING // Store with onions in a cool dark area. Garlic has a storage life of up to 6 months.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Remove clove from bulb and peel. Use whole, sliced, crushed or finely chopped.

Ginger

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // A good source of dietary fibre and vitamin B1.
SELECTING // Look for firm, fresh-looking ginger. It should be pale-brown in colour, with no wrinkled or soft patches
STORING // Store ginger in the crisper section of your fridge for up to two weeks. It can also be wrapped in plastic then frozen for up to 1 month – simply remove and grate as much as you need each time then return to the freezer.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Use a vegetable peeler or small sharp knife to peel away the skin, then chop, slice, grate or juice ginger. You can break a knob off then store the rest for later.

Kohlrabi

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Kohlrabi is an excellent source of vitamin C with some potassium and niacin.
SELECTING // Select smooth, rounded bulbs 8-15cm in diameter. Avoid soft or winkled produce.
STORING // Store in an airtight plastic bag in the refrigerator crisper.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Cut off the base and trim the stalks. Wash thoroughly, cook whole with skin left on. It can be steamed, boiled or microwaved. It can also be peeled and sliced or diced and used in soups or casseroles.

Leeks

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Leeks are a great source vitamin C, iron, folate and fibre.
SELECTING // Look for crisp-looking leeks, with pure white stems.
STORING // Leeks retain their moisture and aroma best when they are in a lightly wrapped plastic bag in the fridge.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Although the entire leek is edible, the tastiest part of the vegetable is the white stalk - the green leaves tend to be stronger and more pungent in taste.

Okra

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Okra are a good source of dietary fibre, vitamin C, iron, calcium, potassium and B6.
SELECTING // Select okra that are small in size and avoid any that are soft or have brown spots.
STORING // Store in a plastic bag in the fridge for up to 4 days.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Cut and discard tops and tails.

Onions

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Onions contain calcium, iron and potassium.
SELECTING // Select onions which are firm, well-shaped with small necks. Avoid spongy or sprouting onions with uneven or patchy skin colouring.
STORING // It's best to store onions in a cool, dry, dark, open space.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Try placing your onions in the fridge before preparing to reduce the sting when cutting. Peel and discard skin and slice flesh.

Parsnips

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Parsnips are an excellent source of vitamin C and a good source of dietary fibre and folic acid.
SELECTING // Select firm, well formed parsnips with smooth skin and no signs of softness.
STORING // Store in an air tight plastic bag in the refrigerator crisper and use as soon as possible.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Scrub well and trim top and root. Slice thinly, julienne, dice or grate. Serve with dips, use in baked dishes, soups and casseroles.

Potatoes

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Potatoes are a good source of vitamin C, potassium and dietary fibre.
SELECTING // Select potatoes that have firm, dry skin.
STORING // Store in a cool, dry, dark and well-ventilated place.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Clean with a brush and cook with the skin on, but remove any green sections. If skins have to be removed, peel thinly with a vegetable peeler and cook as soon as peeled.

Radish

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Radish is a source of vitamin C.
SELECTING // Select radishes with smooth skin that are free from splits or brown patches.
STORING // Remove the leaves and store in the fridge for up to one week.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Trim off the leaves and the root, then wash in cool water. Slice as desired.

Silverbeets

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // A good source of dietary fibre, folic acid, and vitamin C. Contains vitamin B6 and riboflavin and is low in sodium.
SELECTING // Select silverbeet with fresh, dark green, crisp leaves and stalks. Avoid leaves that are wilted or scarred.
STORING // Cut off a large section of white stalk, and store stalks and leaves in an airtight plastic bag in the refrigerator crisper.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Trim and remove stalks. Wash leaves and slice. Use in stir-fries, steamed, pureed, combined in quiches, pies or filo parcels.

Spring Onion/Eschallots

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Spring onions are a good source of vitamin C and dietary fibre.
SELECTING // Select eschallots that are medium-sized with fresh looking green leaves that don’t droop too much.
STORING // Refrigerate unwashed, store in a plastic bag or wrap in plastic.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Strip away outside leaves and chop off root.

Squash

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Squash are a good source of vitamin C.
SELECTING // Make sure the squash have a glossy yellow colour and are firm to the touch.
STORING // Squash are best stored in an airtight plastic bag in the refrigerator crisper.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Simply wash and cook whole, sliced or cut into wedges.

Swede

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Swedes are an excellent source of vitamin C and a good source of dietary fibre.
SELECTING // Select well rounded, smooth skinned swedes. Check stem end for deterioration or softness.
STORING // Store swedes in a cool, slightly damp place out of direct sunlight. Unwashed swedes will keep for several months. Avoid putting the 'roots' in the fridge, but the greens will chill for a couple of days.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Wash and peel.

Sweet Potato

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Sweet Potato are an excellent source of vitamin C, a good source of complex carbohydrate, folic acid, vitamin E, potassium and dietary fibre when consumed with the skin on. Orange and yellow varieties are an excellent source of vitamin A.
SELECTING // Choose clean, smooth, well shaped sweet potato.
STORING // Store in a cool, dark, well ventilated place.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Wash and scrub. There is no need to peel.

Sweetcorn

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Corn is an excellent source of dietary fibre and a good source of of potassium.
SELECTING // Buy corn in its husk for freshness and the best flavour. Look for husks that are bright green with white silky threads.
STORING // Store in its husk in the fridge. Corn is best enjoyed within 2 days of purchasing.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Remove the husks and silk just before cooking. To remove the kernels, use a knife to cut down the length of the corn.

Tomatoes

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Tomatoes are high in vitamin C and vitamin A.
SELECTING // Pick tomatoes that are plump and heavy for their size. Also, make sure the tomatoes have a firm, shiny skin with no wrinkles or blemishes.
STORING // Tomatoes store well at room temperature but if you need to store them for longer, you can store them in your fridge.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // If stored in the fridge, bring to room temperature before slicing. Wash and eat all of the tomato except the stem.

Turnips

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Turnips are an excellent source of vitamin C and a good source of dietary fibre.
SELECTING // Select well-rounded, smooth skinned turnips. Check stem end for deterioration or softness.
STORING // Store in a cool, dark, well ventilated place. Can be stored in the refrigerator crisper.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Wash and peel. Small turnips can be used whole, but large ones should be cut into chunks.

Watercress

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Watercress are a good source of vitamin C and A, niacin, thiamine, riboflavin and iron.
SELECTING // Choose fresh looking bunches with green firm leaves and stalks.
STORING // Store for a few days in a plastic bag in the crisper section of the refrigerator. To refresh submerge in cold water for 10 minutes.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Tear leaves and use in salads and sandwiches. Use as a garnish with meat dishes.

Witlof

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Witlof is high in vitamin C, is a good source of protein, carbohydrates and potassium.
SELECTING // Look for tightly packed leaves with fresh tips.
STORING // Witlof is best stored away from light. Store in a brown paper bag in the crisper for up to two days.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // To reduce the bitterness, cut the harder inner part of the stem off before cooking.

Zucchini

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Zucchini is an excellent source of vitamin C.
SELECTING // Select firm zucchini with glossy skin.
STORING // Store in a sealed plastic bag in the crisper for up to three days.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Wash and pat dry with a towel. Remove both ends and prepare as desired.

Zucchini Flowers

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Zucchini flowers are a good source of vitamins A, C, E, and K.
SELECTING // Look for firm, fresh looking flowers that are only slightly open.
STORING // Use them the day you buy them.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Remove stamens, anthers and ovaries before cooking. Many recipes involve stuffing zucchini flowers.

Artichokes

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Artichokes are a good source of vitamin C and thiamine and contain some dietary fibre, calcium, phosphorus, niacin and potassium.
SELECTING // The size of an artichoke does not necessarily indicate quality. Select artichokes with tight, compact, heavy heads that yield slightly to pressure. Leaves should be a green, purple or bronze in colour. Avoid artichokes with opened out, curled or dry looking leaves.
STORING // Globe artichokes should be stored in an airtight plastic bag, in the refrigerator crisper. Store Jerusalem artichokes in a cool, dry place.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Artichokes can be added raw, whole, sliced or quartered to stews, casseroles and soups.

Brussel Sprouts

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Brussels sprouts are packed full of vitamin C. They are also full of vitamin D, folic acid, potassium and vitamin K.
SELECTING // Select brussel sprouts that are firm and slightly springy to the touch
STORING // Brussels sprouts are best kept in the fridge in a perforated plastic bag.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // : A chef's secret is to cut an 'X' in the bottom of the brussel sprout; this helps the core to cook quickly, meaning the entire brussel sprout will be tender and juicy when you eat it.

Cabbage

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Cabbages are packed with vitamin C, dietary fibre and folate.
SELECTING // Look for crisp, brightly coloured cabbages with a subtle sweet smell.
STORING // Store cabbages in a plastic bag in the crisper section of your refrigerator for three to four days.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Green cabbage has a refreshing flavour and crunchy texture, while red cabbage has thicker leaves and a slightly sweeter taste. They can both be substituted for one another in recipes.

Capsicum

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // By weight, green capsicums have twice as much vitamin C as citrus fruit. They are also a great source of vitamin B6, vitamin E, potassium and antioxidants.
SELECTING // Make sure the skin is firm, glossy and bright with no wrinkles, soft spots or blemishes.
STORING // Keep capsicums in the crisper section or in a sealed plastic bag in the fridge for up to 1 week.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Cut in half and remove the seeds and membrane. When preparing the smaller varieties, cut off the top and scoop out the seeds and membrane.

Carrots

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Carrots are an excellent source of vitamin A, a useful source of vitamin C and a good source of dietary fibre.
SELECTING // Select carrots with good colour and no signs of bending or limpness.
STORING // Store unwashed in and airtight plastic bag in the refrigerator crisper.
AVAILABLE AT // Wetherill Park,Leichhardt,Penrith
PREPARING // Wash in cold water, peel thinly or use unpeeled. Trim the top and tail. Use whole, sliced, diced, julienned or grated in casseroles, soups, salads or cakes.

Celeriac

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // A very good source of dietary fibre and a good source of vitamin C.
SELECTING // Look for stalks and leaves that have a fresh appearance and tubers which are firm, clean and free from damage.
STORING // Cut stalks from tuber and place in an airtight plastic bag. Store both sections in the refrigerator crisper.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Celeriac is suited to a variety of preparation methods and may be served raw or cooked.

Chestnuts

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Chestnuts are a good source of vitamins C, B1 and B2 and folate. 
SELECTING // The firmer a chestnut feels, the fresher it will be. Look for even-sized nuts which feel heavy for their size, with undamaged, firm shells.
STORING // Store in an airtight container, paper bag or perforated plastic bag in the crisper compartment of the fridge.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Cut the shell before cooking to prevent the nut exploding while cooking.

Chillies

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Chillies are high in anti-oxidants and vitamin C.
SELECTING // Look for even-coloured chillies with taut skin.
STORING // Store in the crisper section or in a sealed plastic bag in the fridge for up to one week.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Wear gloves or wash hands thoroughly after chopping and deseeding chillies, as they can irritate your eyes and skin.

Garlic

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Garlic is a good source of dietary fibre. Garlic is valued for its medicinal qualities, particularly as an antiseptic and a cold/flu deterrent.
SELECTING // Select plump firm bulbs with no sign of bruising or decay.
STORING // Store with onions in a cool dark area. Garlic has a storage life of up to 6 months.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Remove clove from bulb and peel. Use whole, sliced, crushed or finely chopped.

Ginger

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // A good source of dietary fibre and vitamin B1.
SELECTING // Look for firm, fresh-looking ginger. It should be pale-brown in colour, with no wrinkled or soft patches
STORING // Store ginger in the crisper section of your fridge for up to two weeks. It can also be wrapped in plastic then frozen for up to 1 month – simply remove and grate as much as you need each time then return to the freezer.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Use a vegetable peeler or small sharp knife to peel away the skin, then chop, slice, grate or juice ginger. You can break a knob off then store the rest for later.

Kohlrabi

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Kohlrabi is an excellent source of vitamin C with some potassium and niacin.
SELECTING // Select smooth, rounded bulbs 8-15cm in diameter. Avoid soft or winkled produce.
STORING // Store in an airtight plastic bag in the refrigerator crisper.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Cut off the base and trim the stalks. Wash thoroughly, cook whole with skin left on. It can be steamed, boiled or microwaved. It can also be peeled and sliced or diced and used in soups or casseroles.

Leeks

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Leeks are a great source vitamin C, iron, folate and fibre.
SELECTING // Look for crisp-looking leeks, with pure white stems.
STORING // Leeks retain their moisture and aroma best when they are in a lightly wrapped plastic bag in the fridge.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Although the entire leek is edible, the tastiest part of the vegetable is the white stalk - the green leaves tend to be stronger and more pungent in taste.

Okra

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Okra are a good source of dietary fibre, vitamin C, iron, calcium, potassium and B6.
SELECTING // Select okra that are small in size and avoid any that are soft or have brown spots.
STORING // Store in a plastic bag in the fridge for up to 4 days.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Cut and discard tops and tails.

Olives

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Olives are a good source of dietary fibre, potassium and vitamin A.
SELECTING // Select firm, unblemished fruit.
STORING // Store in an airtight plastic bag in the refrigerator crisper until they are required for processing.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // The olive is inedible until processed, it is usually pickled in a brine or pressed to extract olive oil. Pickled olives can be used in pizzas, salad, casseroles, foccacia and cheese platters.

Onions

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Onions contain calcium, iron and potassium.
SELECTING // Select onions which are firm, well-shaped with small necks. Avoid spongy or sprouting onions with uneven or patchy skin colouring.
STORING // It's best to store onions in a cool, dry, dark, open space.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Try placing your onions in the fridge before preparing to reduce the sting when cutting. Peel and discard skin and slice flesh.

Parsnips

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Parsnips are an excellent source of vitamin C and a good source of dietary fibre and folic acid.
SELECTING // Select firm, well formed parsnips with smooth skin and no signs of softness.
STORING // Store in an air tight plastic bag in the refrigerator crisper and use as soon as possible.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Scrub well and trim top and root. Slice thinly, julienne, dice or grate. Serve with dips, use in baked dishes, soups and casseroles.

Peas

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Peas are an excellent source of vitamin C and a good source of vitamin B3, folate and beta carotene.
SELECTING // : Select green peas that are small to medium in size with waxy, plump, bright green pods. Choose bright, crisp snow peas and sugar snap peas. Smaller pods are generally the most tender.
STORING // Store us in a plastic storage bag in the crisper section of the refrigerator. Use within two to three days.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Remove peas from pods unless they’re very young and tender, then the pods can be cooked and eaten too. Slide thumb down pod to split it open from the stem end and remove peas from top to bottom.

Potatoes

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Potatoes are a good source of vitamin C, potassium and dietary fibre.
SELECTING // Select potatoes that have firm, dry skin.
STORING // Store in a cool, dry, dark and well-ventilated place.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Clean with a brush and cook with the skin on, but remove any green sections. If skins have to be removed, peel thinly with a vegetable peeler and cook as soon as peeled.

Radish

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Radish is a source of vitamin C.
SELECTING // Select radishes with smooth skin that are free from splits or brown patches.
STORING // Remove the leaves and store in the fridge for up to one week.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Trim off the leaves and the root, then wash in cool water. Slice as desired.

Silverbeets

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // A good source of dietary fibre, folic acid, and vitamin C. Contains vitamin B6 and riboflavin and is low in sodium.
SELECTING // Select silverbeet with fresh, dark green, crisp leaves and stalks. Avoid leaves that are wilted or scarred.
STORING // Cut off a large section of white stalk, and store stalks and leaves in an airtight plastic bag in the refrigerator crisper.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Trim and remove stalks. Wash leaves and slice. Use in stir-fries, steamed, pureed, combined in quiches, pies or filo parcels.

Spring Onion/Eschallots

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Spring onions are a good source of vitamin C and dietary fibre.
SELECTING // Select eschallots that are medium-sized with fresh looking green leaves that don’t droop too much.
STORING // Refrigerate unwashed, store in a plastic bag or wrap in plastic.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Strip away outside leaves and chop off root.

Squash

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Squash are a good source of vitamin C.
SELECTING // Make sure the squash have a glossy yellow colour and are firm to the touch.
STORING // Squash are best stored in an airtight plastic bag in the refrigerator crisper.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Simply wash and cook whole, sliced or cut into wedges.

Swede

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Swedes are an excellent source of vitamin C and a good source of dietary fibre.
SELECTING // Select well rounded, smooth skinned swedes. Check stem end for deterioration or softness.
STORING // Store swedes in a cool, slightly damp place out of direct sunlight. Unwashed swedes will keep for several months. Avoid putting the 'roots' in the fridge, but the greens will chill for a couple of days.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Wash and peel.

Sweet Potato

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Sweet Potato are an excellent source of vitamin C, a good source of complex carbohydrate, folic acid, vitamin E, potassium and dietary fibre when consumed with the skin on. Orange and yellow varieties are an excellent source of vitamin A.
SELECTING // Choose clean, smooth, well shaped sweet potato.
STORING // Store in a cool, dark, well ventilated place.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Wash and scrub. There is no need to peel.

Sweetcorn

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Corn is an excellent source of dietary fibre and a good source of of potassium.
SELECTING // Buy corn in its husk for freshness and the best flavour. Look for husks that are bright green with white silky threads.
STORING // Store in its husk in the fridge. Corn is best enjoyed within 2 days of purchasing.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Remove the husks and silk just before cooking. To remove the kernels, use a knife to cut down the length of the corn.

Tomatoes

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Tomatoes are high in vitamin C and vitamin A.
SELECTING // Pick tomatoes that are plump and heavy for their size. Also, make sure the tomatoes have a firm, shiny skin with no wrinkles or blemishes.
STORING // Tomatoes store well at room temperature but if you need to store them for longer, you can store them in your fridge.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // If stored in the fridge, bring to room temperature before slicing. Wash and eat all of the tomato except the stem.

Turnips

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Turnips are an excellent source of vitamin C and a good source of dietary fibre.
SELECTING // Select well-rounded, smooth skinned turnips. Check stem end for deterioration or softness.
STORING // Store in a cool, dark, well ventilated place. Can be stored in the refrigerator crisper.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Wash and peel. Small turnips can be used whole, but large ones should be cut into chunks.

Watercress

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Watercress are a good source of vitamin C and A, niacin, thiamine, riboflavin and iron.
SELECTING // Choose fresh looking bunches with green firm leaves and stalks.
STORING // Store for a few days in a plastic bag in the crisper section of the refrigerator. To refresh submerge in cold water for 10 minutes.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Tear leaves and use in salads and sandwiches. Use as a garnish with meat dishes.

Witlof

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Witlof is high in vitamin C, is a good source of protein, carbohydrates and potassium.
SELECTING // Look for tightly packed leaves with fresh tips.
STORING // Witlof is best stored away from light. Store in a brown paper bag in the crisper for up to two days.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // To reduce the bitterness, cut the harder inner part of the stem off before cooking.

Zucchini

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Zucchini is an excellent source of vitamin C.
SELECTING // Select firm zucchini with glossy skin.
STORING // Store in a sealed plastic bag in the crisper for up to three days.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Wash and pat dry with a towel. Remove both ends and prepare as desired.

Zucchini Flowers

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Zucchini flowers are a good source of vitamins A, C, E, and K.
SELECTING // Look for firm, fresh looking flowers that are only slightly open.
STORING // Use them the day you buy them.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Remove stamens, anthers and ovaries before cooking. Many recipes involve stuffing zucchini flowers.

Artichokes

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Artichokes are a good source of vitamin C and thiamine and contain some dietary fibre, calcium, phosphorus, niacin and potassium.
SELECTING // The size of an artichoke does not necessarily indicate quality. Select artichokes with tight, compact, heavy heads that yield slightly to pressure. Leaves should be a green, purple or bronze in colour. Avoid artichokes with opened out, curled or dry looking leaves.
STORING // Globe artichokes should be stored in an airtight plastic bag, in the refrigerator crisper. Store Jerusalem artichokes in a cool, dry place.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Artichokes can be added raw, whole, sliced or quartered to stews, casseroles and soups.

Brussel Sprouts

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Brussels sprouts are packed full of vitamin C. They are also full of vitamin D, folic acid, potassium and vitamin K.
SELECTING // Select brussel sprouts that are firm and slightly springy to the touch
STORING // Brussels sprouts are best kept in the fridge in a perforated plastic bag.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // : A chef's secret is to cut an 'X' in the bottom of the brussel sprout; this helps the core to cook quickly, meaning the entire brussel sprout will be tender and juicy when you eat it.

Cabbage

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Cabbages are packed with vitamin C, dietary fibre and folate.
SELECTING // Look for crisp, brightly coloured cabbages with a subtle sweet smell.
STORING // Store cabbages in a plastic bag in the crisper section of your refrigerator for three to four days.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Green cabbage has a refreshing flavour and crunchy texture, while red cabbage has thicker leaves and a slightly sweeter taste. They can both be substituted for one another in recipes.

Capsicum

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // By weight, green capsicums have twice as much vitamin C as citrus fruit. They are also a great source of vitamin B6, vitamin E, potassium and antioxidants.
SELECTING // Make sure the skin is firm, glossy and bright with no wrinkles, soft spots or blemishes.
STORING // Keep capsicums in the crisper section or in a sealed plastic bag in the fridge for up to 1 week.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Cut in half and remove the seeds and membrane. When preparing the smaller varieties, cut off the top and scoop out the seeds and membrane.

Carrots

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Carrots are an excellent source of vitamin A, a useful source of vitamin C and a good source of dietary fibre.
SELECTING // Select carrots with good colour and no signs of bending or limpness.
STORING // Store unwashed in and airtight plastic bag in the refrigerator crisper.
AVAILABLE AT // Wetherill Park,Leichhardt,Penrith
PREPARING // Wash in cold water, peel thinly or use unpeeled. Trim the top and tail. Use whole, sliced, diced, julienned or grated in casseroles, soups, salads or cakes.

Celeriac

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // A very good source of dietary fibre and a good source of vitamin C.
SELECTING // Look for stalks and leaves that have a fresh appearance and tubers which are firm, clean and free from damage.
STORING // Cut stalks from tuber and place in an airtight plastic bag. Store both sections in the refrigerator crisper.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Celeriac is suited to a variety of preparation methods and may be served raw or cooked.

Chestnuts

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Chestnuts are a good source of vitamins C, B1 and B2 and folate. 
SELECTING // The firmer a chestnut feels, the fresher it will be. Look for even-sized nuts which feel heavy for their size, with undamaged, firm shells.
STORING // Store in an airtight container, paper bag or perforated plastic bag in the crisper compartment of the fridge.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Cut the shell before cooking to prevent the nut exploding while cooking.

Chillies

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Chillies are high in anti-oxidants and vitamin C.
SELECTING // Look for even-coloured chillies with taut skin.
STORING // Store in the crisper section or in a sealed plastic bag in the fridge for up to one week.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Wear gloves or wash hands thoroughly after chopping and deseeding chillies, as they can irritate your eyes and skin.

Garlic

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Garlic is a good source of dietary fibre. Garlic is valued for its medicinal qualities, particularly as an antiseptic and a cold/flu deterrent.
SELECTING // Select plump firm bulbs with no sign of bruising or decay.
STORING // Store with onions in a cool dark area. Garlic has a storage life of up to 6 months.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Remove clove from bulb and peel. Use whole, sliced, crushed or finely chopped.

Ginger

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // A good source of dietary fibre and vitamin B1.
SELECTING // Look for firm, fresh-looking ginger. It should be pale-brown in colour, with no wrinkled or soft patches
STORING // Store ginger in the crisper section of your fridge for up to two weeks. It can also be wrapped in plastic then frozen for up to 1 month – simply remove and grate as much as you need each time then return to the freezer.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Use a vegetable peeler or small sharp knife to peel away the skin, then chop, slice, grate or juice ginger. You can break a knob off then store the rest for later.

Kohlrabi

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Kohlrabi is an excellent source of vitamin C with some potassium and niacin.
SELECTING // Select smooth, rounded bulbs 8-15cm in diameter. Avoid soft or winkled produce.
STORING // Store in an airtight plastic bag in the refrigerator crisper.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Cut off the base and trim the stalks. Wash thoroughly, cook whole with skin left on. It can be steamed, boiled or microwaved. It can also be peeled and sliced or diced and used in soups or casseroles.

Leeks

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Leeks are a great source vitamin C, iron, folate and fibre.
SELECTING // Look for crisp-looking leeks, with pure white stems.
STORING // Leeks retain their moisture and aroma best when they are in a lightly wrapped plastic bag in the fridge.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Although the entire leek is edible, the tastiest part of the vegetable is the white stalk - the green leaves tend to be stronger and more pungent in taste.

Okra

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Okra are a good source of dietary fibre, vitamin C, iron, calcium, potassium and B6.
SELECTING // Select okra that are small in size and avoid any that are soft or have brown spots.
STORING // Store in a plastic bag in the fridge for up to 4 days.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Cut and discard tops and tails.

Olives

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Olives are a good source of dietary fibre, potassium and vitamin A.
SELECTING // Select firm, unblemished fruit.
STORING // Store in an airtight plastic bag in the refrigerator crisper until they are required for processing.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // The olive is inedible until processed, it is usually pickled in a brine or pressed to extract olive oil. Pickled olives can be used in pizzas, salad, casseroles, foccacia and cheese platters.

Onions

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Onions contain calcium, iron and potassium.
SELECTING // Select onions which are firm, well-shaped with small necks. Avoid spongy or sprouting onions with uneven or patchy skin colouring.
STORING // It's best to store onions in a cool, dry, dark, open space.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Try placing your onions in the fridge before preparing to reduce the sting when cutting. Peel and discard skin and slice flesh.

Parsnips

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Parsnips are an excellent source of vitamin C and a good source of dietary fibre and folic acid.
SELECTING // Select firm, well formed parsnips with smooth skin and no signs of softness.
STORING // Store in an air tight plastic bag in the refrigerator crisper and use as soon as possible.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Scrub well and trim top and root. Slice thinly, julienne, dice or grate. Serve with dips, use in baked dishes, soups and casseroles.

Peas

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Peas are an excellent source of vitamin C and a good source of vitamin B3, folate and beta carotene.
SELECTING // : Select green peas that are small to medium in size with waxy, plump, bright green pods. Choose bright, crisp snow peas and sugar snap peas. Smaller pods are generally the most tender.
STORING // Store us in a plastic storage bag in the crisper section of the refrigerator. Use within two to three days.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Remove peas from pods unless they’re very young and tender, then the pods can be cooked and eaten too. Slide thumb down pod to split it open from the stem end and remove peas from top to bottom.

Potatoes

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Potatoes are a good source of vitamin C, potassium and dietary fibre.
SELECTING // Select potatoes that have firm, dry skin.
STORING // Store in a cool, dry, dark and well-ventilated place.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Clean with a brush and cook with the skin on, but remove any green sections. If skins have to be removed, peel thinly with a vegetable peeler and cook as soon as peeled.

Radish

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Radish is a source of vitamin C.
SELECTING // Select radishes with smooth skin that are free from splits or brown patches.
STORING // Remove the leaves and store in the fridge for up to one week.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Trim off the leaves and the root, then wash in cool water. Slice as desired.

Silverbeets

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // A good source of dietary fibre, folic acid, and vitamin C. Contains vitamin B6 and riboflavin and is low in sodium.
SELECTING // Select silverbeet with fresh, dark green, crisp leaves and stalks. Avoid leaves that are wilted or scarred.
STORING // Cut off a large section of white stalk, and store stalks and leaves in an airtight plastic bag in the refrigerator crisper.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Trim and remove stalks. Wash leaves and slice. Use in stir-fries, steamed, pureed, combined in quiches, pies or filo parcels.

Spring Onion/Eschallots

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Spring onions are a good source of vitamin C and dietary fibre.
SELECTING // Select eschallots that are medium-sized with fresh looking green leaves that don’t droop too much.
STORING // Refrigerate unwashed, store in a plastic bag or wrap in plastic.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Strip away outside leaves and chop off root.

Squash

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Squash are a good source of vitamin C.
SELECTING // Make sure the squash have a glossy yellow colour and are firm to the touch.
STORING // Squash are best stored in an airtight plastic bag in the refrigerator crisper.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Simply wash and cook whole, sliced or cut into wedges.

Swede

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Swedes are an excellent source of vitamin C and a good source of dietary fibre.
SELECTING // Select well rounded, smooth skinned swedes. Check stem end for deterioration or softness.
STORING // Store swedes in a cool, slightly damp place out of direct sunlight. Unwashed swedes will keep for several months. Avoid putting the 'roots' in the fridge, but the greens will chill for a couple of days.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Wash and peel.

Sweet Potato

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Sweet Potato are an excellent source of vitamin C, a good source of complex carbohydrate, folic acid, vitamin E, potassium and dietary fibre when consumed with the skin on. Orange and yellow varieties are an excellent source of vitamin A.
SELECTING // Choose clean, smooth, well shaped sweet potato.
STORING // Store in a cool, dark, well ventilated place.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Wash and scrub. There is no need to peel.

Sweetcorn

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Corn is an excellent source of dietary fibre and a good source of of potassium.
SELECTING // Buy corn in its husk for freshness and the best flavour. Look for husks that are bright green with white silky threads.
STORING // Store in its husk in the fridge. Corn is best enjoyed within 2 days of purchasing.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Remove the husks and silk just before cooking. To remove the kernels, use a knife to cut down the length of the corn.

Tomatoes

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Tomatoes are high in vitamin C and vitamin A.
SELECTING // Pick tomatoes that are plump and heavy for their size. Also, make sure the tomatoes have a firm, shiny skin with no wrinkles or blemishes.
STORING // Tomatoes store well at room temperature but if you need to store them for longer, you can store them in your fridge.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // If stored in the fridge, bring to room temperature before slicing. Wash and eat all of the tomato except the stem.

Turnips

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Turnips are an excellent source of vitamin C and a good source of dietary fibre.
SELECTING // Select well-rounded, smooth skinned turnips. Check stem end for deterioration or softness.
STORING // Store in a cool, dark, well ventilated place. Can be stored in the refrigerator crisper.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Wash and peel. Small turnips can be used whole, but large ones should be cut into chunks.

Watercress

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Watercress are a good source of vitamin C and A, niacin, thiamine, riboflavin and iron.
SELECTING // Choose fresh looking bunches with green firm leaves and stalks.
STORING // Store for a few days in a plastic bag in the crisper section of the refrigerator. To refresh submerge in cold water for 10 minutes.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Tear leaves and use in salads and sandwiches. Use as a garnish with meat dishes.

Witlof

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Witlof is high in vitamin C, is a good source of protein, carbohydrates and potassium.
SELECTING // Look for tightly packed leaves with fresh tips.
STORING // Witlof is best stored away from light. Store in a brown paper bag in the crisper for up to two days.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // To reduce the bitterness, cut the harder inner part of the stem off before cooking.

Zucchini

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Zucchini is an excellent source of vitamin C.
SELECTING // Select firm zucchini with glossy skin.
STORING // Store in a sealed plastic bag in the crisper for up to three days.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Wash and pat dry with a towel. Remove both ends and prepare as desired.

Zucchini Flowers

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Zucchini flowers are a good source of vitamins A, C, E, and K.
SELECTING // Look for firm, fresh looking flowers that are only slightly open.
STORING // Use them the day you buy them.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Remove stamens, anthers and ovaries before cooking. Many recipes involve stuffing zucchini flowers.

Artichokes

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Artichokes are a good source of vitamin C and thiamine and contain some dietary fibre, calcium, phosphorus, niacin and potassium.
SELECTING // The size of an artichoke does not necessarily indicate quality. Select artichokes with tight, compact, heavy heads that yield slightly to pressure. Leaves should be a green, purple or bronze in colour. Avoid artichokes with opened out, curled or dry looking leaves.
STORING // Globe artichokes should be stored in an airtight plastic bag, in the refrigerator crisper. Store Jerusalem artichokes in a cool, dry place.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Artichokes can be added raw, whole, sliced or quartered to stews, casseroles and soups.

Brussel Sprouts

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Brussels sprouts are packed full of vitamin C. They are also full of vitamin D, folic acid, potassium and vitamin K.
SELECTING // Select brussel sprouts that are firm and slightly springy to the touch
STORING // Brussels sprouts are best kept in the fridge in a perforated plastic bag.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // : A chef's secret is to cut an 'X' in the bottom of the brussel sprout; this helps the core to cook quickly, meaning the entire brussel sprout will be tender and juicy when you eat it.

Cabbage

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Cabbages are packed with vitamin C, dietary fibre and folate.
SELECTING // Look for crisp, brightly coloured cabbages with a subtle sweet smell.
STORING // Store cabbages in a plastic bag in the crisper section of your refrigerator for three to four days.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Green cabbage has a refreshing flavour and crunchy texture, while red cabbage has thicker leaves and a slightly sweeter taste. They can both be substituted for one another in recipes.

Capsicum

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // By weight, green capsicums have twice as much vitamin C as citrus fruit. They are also a great source of vitamin B6, vitamin E, potassium and antioxidants.
SELECTING // Make sure the skin is firm, glossy and bright with no wrinkles, soft spots or blemishes.
STORING // Keep capsicums in the crisper section or in a sealed plastic bag in the fridge for up to 1 week.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Cut in half and remove the seeds and membrane. When preparing the smaller varieties, cut off the top and scoop out the seeds and membrane.

Carrots

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Carrots are an excellent source of vitamin A, a useful source of vitamin C and a good source of dietary fibre.
SELECTING // Select carrots with good colour and no signs of bending or limpness.
STORING // Store unwashed in and airtight plastic bag in the refrigerator crisper.
AVAILABLE AT // Wetherill Park,Leichhardt,Penrith
PREPARING // Wash in cold water, peel thinly or use unpeeled. Trim the top and tail. Use whole, sliced, diced, julienned or grated in casseroles, soups, salads or cakes.

Celeriac

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // A very good source of dietary fibre and a good source of vitamin C.
SELECTING // Look for stalks and leaves that have a fresh appearance and tubers which are firm, clean and free from damage.
STORING // Cut stalks from tuber and place in an airtight plastic bag. Store both sections in the refrigerator crisper.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Celeriac is suited to a variety of preparation methods and may be served raw or cooked.

Chestnuts

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Chestnuts are a good source of vitamins C, B1 and B2 and folate. 
SELECTING // The firmer a chestnut feels, the fresher it will be. Look for even-sized nuts which feel heavy for their size, with undamaged, firm shells.
STORING // Store in an airtight container, paper bag or perforated plastic bag in the crisper compartment of the fridge.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Cut the shell before cooking to prevent the nut exploding while cooking.

Chillies

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Chillies are high in anti-oxidants and vitamin C.
SELECTING // Look for even-coloured chillies with taut skin.
STORING // Store in the crisper section or in a sealed plastic bag in the fridge for up to one week.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Wear gloves or wash hands thoroughly after chopping and deseeding chillies, as they can irritate your eyes and skin.

Garlic

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Garlic is a good source of dietary fibre. Garlic is valued for its medicinal qualities, particularly as an antiseptic and a cold/flu deterrent.
SELECTING // Select plump firm bulbs with no sign of bruising or decay.
STORING // Store with onions in a cool dark area. Garlic has a storage life of up to 6 months.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Remove clove from bulb and peel. Use whole, sliced, crushed or finely chopped.

Ginger

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // A good source of dietary fibre and vitamin B1.
SELECTING // Look for firm, fresh-looking ginger. It should be pale-brown in colour, with no wrinkled or soft patches
STORING // Store ginger in the crisper section of your fridge for up to two weeks. It can also be wrapped in plastic then frozen for up to 1 month – simply remove and grate as much as you need each time then return to the freezer.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Use a vegetable peeler or small sharp knife to peel away the skin, then chop, slice, grate or juice ginger. You can break a knob off then store the rest for later.

Kohlrabi

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Kohlrabi is an excellent source of vitamin C with some potassium and niacin.
SELECTING // Select smooth, rounded bulbs 8-15cm in diameter. Avoid soft or winkled produce.
STORING // Store in an airtight plastic bag in the refrigerator crisper.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Cut off the base and trim the stalks. Wash thoroughly, cook whole with skin left on. It can be steamed, boiled or microwaved. It can also be peeled and sliced or diced and used in soups or casseroles.

Leeks

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Leeks are a great source vitamin C, iron, folate and fibre.
SELECTING // Look for crisp-looking leeks, with pure white stems.
STORING // Leeks retain their moisture and aroma best when they are in a lightly wrapped plastic bag in the fridge.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Although the entire leek is edible, the tastiest part of the vegetable is the white stalk - the green leaves tend to be stronger and more pungent in taste.

Okra

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Okra are a good source of dietary fibre, vitamin C, iron, calcium, potassium and B6.
SELECTING // Select okra that are small in size and avoid any that are soft or have brown spots.
STORING // Store in a plastic bag in the fridge for up to 4 days.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Cut and discard tops and tails.

Olives

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Olives are a good source of dietary fibre, potassium and vitamin A.
SELECTING // Select firm, unblemished fruit.
STORING // Store in an airtight plastic bag in the refrigerator crisper until they are required for processing.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // The olive is inedible until processed, it is usually pickled in a brine or pressed to extract olive oil. Pickled olives can be used in pizzas, salad, casseroles, foccacia and cheese platters.

Onions

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Onions contain calcium, iron and potassium.
SELECTING // Select onions which are firm, well-shaped with small necks. Avoid spongy or sprouting onions with uneven or patchy skin colouring.
STORING // It's best to store onions in a cool, dry, dark, open space.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Try placing your onions in the fridge before preparing to reduce the sting when cutting. Peel and discard skin and slice flesh.

Parsnips

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Parsnips are an excellent source of vitamin C and a good source of dietary fibre and folic acid.
SELECTING // Select firm, well formed parsnips with smooth skin and no signs of softness.
STORING // Store in an air tight plastic bag in the refrigerator crisper and use as soon as possible.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Scrub well and trim top and root. Slice thinly, julienne, dice or grate. Serve with dips, use in baked dishes, soups and casseroles.

Peas

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Peas are an excellent source of vitamin C and a good source of vitamin B3, folate and beta carotene.
SELECTING // : Select green peas that are small to medium in size with waxy, plump, bright green pods. Choose bright, crisp snow peas and sugar snap peas. Smaller pods are generally the most tender.
STORING // Store us in a plastic storage bag in the crisper section of the refrigerator. Use within two to three days.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Remove peas from pods unless they’re very young and tender, then the pods can be cooked and eaten too. Slide thumb down pod to split it open from the stem end and remove peas from top to bottom.

Potatoes

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Potatoes are a good source of vitamin C, potassium and dietary fibre.
SELECTING // Select potatoes that have firm, dry skin.
STORING // Store in a cool, dry, dark and well-ventilated place.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Clean with a brush and cook with the skin on, but remove any green sections. If skins have to be removed, peel thinly with a vegetable peeler and cook as soon as peeled.

Radish

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Radish is a source of vitamin C.
SELECTING // Select radishes with smooth skin that are free from splits or brown patches.
STORING // Remove the leaves and store in the fridge for up to one week.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Trim off the leaves and the root, then wash in cool water. Slice as desired.

Silverbeets

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // A good source of dietary fibre, folic acid, and vitamin C. Contains vitamin B6 and riboflavin and is low in sodium.
SELECTING // Select silverbeet with fresh, dark green, crisp leaves and stalks. Avoid leaves that are wilted or scarred.
STORING // Cut off a large section of white stalk, and store stalks and leaves in an airtight plastic bag in the refrigerator crisper.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Trim and remove stalks. Wash leaves and slice. Use in stir-fries, steamed, pureed, combined in quiches, pies or filo parcels.

Spring Onion/Eschallots

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Spring onions are a good source of vitamin C and dietary fibre.
SELECTING // Select eschallots that are medium-sized with fresh looking green leaves that don’t droop too much.
STORING // Refrigerate unwashed, store in a plastic bag or wrap in plastic.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Strip away outside leaves and chop off root.

Squash

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Squash are a good source of vitamin C.
SELECTING // Make sure the squash have a glossy yellow colour and are firm to the touch.
STORING // Squash are best stored in an airtight plastic bag in the refrigerator crisper.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Simply wash and cook whole, sliced or cut into wedges.

Swede

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Swedes are an excellent source of vitamin C and a good source of dietary fibre.
SELECTING // Select well rounded, smooth skinned swedes. Check stem end for deterioration or softness.
STORING // Store swedes in a cool, slightly damp place out of direct sunlight. Unwashed swedes will keep for several months. Avoid putting the 'roots' in the fridge, but the greens will chill for a couple of days.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Wash and peel.

Sweet Potato

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Sweet Potato are an excellent source of vitamin C, a good source of complex carbohydrate, folic acid, vitamin E, potassium and dietary fibre when consumed with the skin on. Orange and yellow varieties are an excellent source of vitamin A.
SELECTING // Choose clean, smooth, well shaped sweet potato.
STORING // Store in a cool, dark, well ventilated place.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Wash and scrub. There is no need to peel.

Sweetcorn

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Corn is an excellent source of dietary fibre and a good source of of potassium.
SELECTING // Buy corn in its husk for freshness and the best flavour. Look for husks that are bright green with white silky threads.
STORING // Store in its husk in the fridge. Corn is best enjoyed within 2 days of purchasing.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Remove the husks and silk just before cooking. To remove the kernels, use a knife to cut down the length of the corn.

Tomatoes

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Tomatoes are high in vitamin C and vitamin A.
SELECTING // Pick tomatoes that are plump and heavy for their size. Also, make sure the tomatoes have a firm, shiny skin with no wrinkles or blemishes.
STORING // Tomatoes store well at room temperature but if you need to store them for longer, you can store them in your fridge.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // If stored in the fridge, bring to room temperature before slicing. Wash and eat all of the tomato except the stem.

Turnips

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Turnips are an excellent source of vitamin C and a good source of dietary fibre.
SELECTING // Select well-rounded, smooth skinned turnips. Check stem end for deterioration or softness.
STORING // Store in a cool, dark, well ventilated place. Can be stored in the refrigerator crisper.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Wash and peel. Small turnips can be used whole, but large ones should be cut into chunks.

Watercress

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Watercress are a good source of vitamin C and A, niacin, thiamine, riboflavin and iron.
SELECTING // Choose fresh looking bunches with green firm leaves and stalks.
STORING // Store for a few days in a plastic bag in the crisper section of the refrigerator. To refresh submerge in cold water for 10 minutes.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Tear leaves and use in salads and sandwiches. Use as a garnish with meat dishes.

Witlof

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Witlof is high in vitamin C, is a good source of protein, carbohydrates and potassium.
SELECTING // Look for tightly packed leaves with fresh tips.
STORING // Witlof is best stored away from light. Store in a brown paper bag in the crisper for up to two days.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // To reduce the bitterness, cut the harder inner part of the stem off before cooking.

Zucchini

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Zucchini is an excellent source of vitamin C.
SELECTING // Select firm zucchini with glossy skin.
STORING // Store in a sealed plastic bag in the crisper for up to three days.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Wash and pat dry with a towel. Remove both ends and prepare as desired.

Zucchini Flowers

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Zucchini flowers are a good source of vitamins A, C, E, and K.
SELECTING // Look for firm, fresh looking flowers that are only slightly open.
STORING // Use them the day you buy them.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Remove stamens, anthers and ovaries before cooking. Many recipes involve stuffing zucchini flowers.

Artichokes

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Artichokes are a good source of vitamin C and thiamine and contain some dietary fibre, calcium, phosphorus, niacin and potassium.
SELECTING // The size of an artichoke does not necessarily indicate quality. Select artichokes with tight, compact, heavy heads that yield slightly to pressure. Leaves should be a green, purple or bronze in colour. Avoid artichokes with opened out, curled or dry looking leaves.
STORING // Globe artichokes should be stored in an airtight plastic bag, in the refrigerator crisper. Store Jerusalem artichokes in a cool, dry place.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Artichokes can be added raw, whole, sliced or quartered to stews, casseroles and soups.

Brussel Sprouts

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Brussels sprouts are packed full of vitamin C. They are also full of vitamin D, folic acid, potassium and vitamin K.
SELECTING // Select brussel sprouts that are firm and slightly springy to the touch
STORING // Brussels sprouts are best kept in the fridge in a perforated plastic bag.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // : A chef's secret is to cut an 'X' in the bottom of the brussel sprout; this helps the core to cook quickly, meaning the entire brussel sprout will be tender and juicy when you eat it.

Cabbage

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Cabbages are packed with vitamin C, dietary fibre and folate.
SELECTING // Look for crisp, brightly coloured cabbages with a subtle sweet smell.
STORING // Store cabbages in a plastic bag in the crisper section of your refrigerator for three to four days.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Green cabbage has a refreshing flavour and crunchy texture, while red cabbage has thicker leaves and a slightly sweeter taste. They can both be substituted for one another in recipes.

Capsicum

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // By weight, green capsicums have twice as much vitamin C as citrus fruit. They are also a great source of vitamin B6, vitamin E, potassium and antioxidants.
SELECTING // Make sure the skin is firm, glossy and bright with no wrinkles, soft spots or blemishes.
STORING // Keep capsicums in the crisper section or in a sealed plastic bag in the fridge for up to 1 week.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Cut in half and remove the seeds and membrane. When preparing the smaller varieties, cut off the top and scoop out the seeds and membrane.

Carrots

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Carrots are an excellent source of vitamin A, a useful source of vitamin C and a good source of dietary fibre.
SELECTING // Select carrots with good colour and no signs of bending or limpness.
STORING // Store unwashed in and airtight plastic bag in the refrigerator crisper.
AVAILABLE AT // Wetherill Park,Leichhardt,Penrith
PREPARING // Wash in cold water, peel thinly or use unpeeled. Trim the top and tail. Use whole, sliced, diced, julienned or grated in casseroles, soups, salads or cakes.

Celeriac

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // A very good source of dietary fibre and a good source of vitamin C.
SELECTING // Look for stalks and leaves that have a fresh appearance and tubers which are firm, clean and free from damage.
STORING // Cut stalks from tuber and place in an airtight plastic bag. Store both sections in the refrigerator crisper.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Celeriac is suited to a variety of preparation methods and may be served raw or cooked.

Chestnuts

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Chestnuts are a good source of vitamins C, B1 and B2 and folate. 
SELECTING // The firmer a chestnut feels, the fresher it will be. Look for even-sized nuts which feel heavy for their size, with undamaged, firm shells.
STORING // Store in an airtight container, paper bag or perforated plastic bag in the crisper compartment of the fridge.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Cut the shell before cooking to prevent the nut exploding while cooking.

Chillies

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Chillies are high in anti-oxidants and vitamin C.
SELECTING // Look for even-coloured chillies with taut skin.
STORING // Store in the crisper section or in a sealed plastic bag in the fridge for up to one week.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Wear gloves or wash hands thoroughly after chopping and deseeding chillies, as they can irritate your eyes and skin.

Garlic

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Garlic is a good source of dietary fibre. Garlic is valued for its medicinal qualities, particularly as an antiseptic and a cold/flu deterrent.
SELECTING // Select plump firm bulbs with no sign of bruising or decay.
STORING // Store with onions in a cool dark area. Garlic has a storage life of up to 6 months.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Remove clove from bulb and peel. Use whole, sliced, crushed or finely chopped.

Ginger

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // A good source of dietary fibre and vitamin B1.
SELECTING // Look for firm, fresh-looking ginger. It should be pale-brown in colour, with no wrinkled or soft patches
STORING // Store ginger in the crisper section of your fridge for up to two weeks. It can also be wrapped in plastic then frozen for up to 1 month – simply remove and grate as much as you need each time then return to the freezer.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Use a vegetable peeler or small sharp knife to peel away the skin, then chop, slice, grate or juice ginger. You can break a knob off then store the rest for later.

Kohlrabi

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Kohlrabi is an excellent source of vitamin C with some potassium and niacin.
SELECTING // Select smooth, rounded bulbs 8-15cm in diameter. Avoid soft or winkled produce.
STORING // Store in an airtight plastic bag in the refrigerator crisper.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Cut off the base and trim the stalks. Wash thoroughly, cook whole with skin left on. It can be steamed, boiled or microwaved. It can also be peeled and sliced or diced and used in soups or casseroles.

Leeks

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Leeks are a great source vitamin C, iron, folate and fibre.
SELECTING // Look for crisp-looking leeks, with pure white stems.
STORING // Leeks retain their moisture and aroma best when they are in a lightly wrapped plastic bag in the fridge.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Although the entire leek is edible, the tastiest part of the vegetable is the white stalk - the green leaves tend to be stronger and more pungent in taste.

Onions

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Onions contain calcium, iron and potassium.
SELECTING // Select onions which are firm, well-shaped with small necks. Avoid spongy or sprouting onions with uneven or patchy skin colouring.
STORING // It's best to store onions in a cool, dry, dark, open space.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Try placing your onions in the fridge before preparing to reduce the sting when cutting. Peel and discard skin and slice flesh.

Parsnips

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Parsnips are an excellent source of vitamin C and a good source of dietary fibre and folic acid.
SELECTING // Select firm, well formed parsnips with smooth skin and no signs of softness.
STORING // Store in an air tight plastic bag in the refrigerator crisper and use as soon as possible.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Scrub well and trim top and root. Slice thinly, julienne, dice or grate. Serve with dips, use in baked dishes, soups and casseroles.

Peas

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Peas are an excellent source of vitamin C and a good source of vitamin B3, folate and beta carotene.
SELECTING // : Select green peas that are small to medium in size with waxy, plump, bright green pods. Choose bright, crisp snow peas and sugar snap peas. Smaller pods are generally the most tender.
STORING // Store us in a plastic storage bag in the crisper section of the refrigerator. Use within two to three days.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Remove peas from pods unless they’re very young and tender, then the pods can be cooked and eaten too. Slide thumb down pod to split it open from the stem end and remove peas from top to bottom.

Potatoes

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Potatoes are a good source of vitamin C, potassium and dietary fibre.
SELECTING // Select potatoes that have firm, dry skin.
STORING // Store in a cool, dry, dark and well-ventilated place.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Clean with a brush and cook with the skin on, but remove any green sections. If skins have to be removed, peel thinly with a vegetable peeler and cook as soon as peeled.

Radish

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Radish is a source of vitamin C.
SELECTING // Select radishes with smooth skin that are free from splits or brown patches.
STORING // Remove the leaves and store in the fridge for up to one week.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Trim off the leaves and the root, then wash in cool water. Slice as desired.

Silverbeets

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // A good source of dietary fibre, folic acid, and vitamin C. Contains vitamin B6 and riboflavin and is low in sodium.
SELECTING // Select silverbeet with fresh, dark green, crisp leaves and stalks. Avoid leaves that are wilted or scarred.
STORING // Cut off a large section of white stalk, and store stalks and leaves in an airtight plastic bag in the refrigerator crisper.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Trim and remove stalks. Wash leaves and slice. Use in stir-fries, steamed, pureed, combined in quiches, pies or filo parcels.

Spring Onion/Eschallots

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Spring onions are a good source of vitamin C and dietary fibre.
SELECTING // Select eschallots that are medium-sized with fresh looking green leaves that don’t droop too much.
STORING // Refrigerate unwashed, store in a plastic bag or wrap in plastic.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Strip away outside leaves and chop off root.

Squash

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Squash are a good source of vitamin C.
SELECTING // Make sure the squash have a glossy yellow colour and are firm to the touch.
STORING // Squash are best stored in an airtight plastic bag in the refrigerator crisper.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Simply wash and cook whole, sliced or cut into wedges.

Swede

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Swedes are an excellent source of vitamin C and a good source of dietary fibre.
SELECTING // Select well rounded, smooth skinned swedes. Check stem end for deterioration or softness.
STORING // Store swedes in a cool, slightly damp place out of direct sunlight. Unwashed swedes will keep for several months. Avoid putting the 'roots' in the fridge, but the greens will chill for a couple of days.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Wash and peel.

Sweet Potato

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Sweet Potato are an excellent source of vitamin C, a good source of complex carbohydrate, folic acid, vitamin E, potassium and dietary fibre when consumed with the skin on. Orange and yellow varieties are an excellent source of vitamin A.
SELECTING // Choose clean, smooth, well shaped sweet potato.
STORING // Store in a cool, dark, well ventilated place.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Wash and scrub. There is no need to peel.

Sweetcorn

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Corn is an excellent source of dietary fibre and a good source of of potassium.
SELECTING // Buy corn in its husk for freshness and the best flavour. Look for husks that are bright green with white silky threads.
STORING // Store in its husk in the fridge. Corn is best enjoyed within 2 days of purchasing.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Remove the husks and silk just before cooking. To remove the kernels, use a knife to cut down the length of the corn.

Tomatoes

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Tomatoes are high in vitamin C and vitamin A.
SELECTING // Pick tomatoes that are plump and heavy for their size. Also, make sure the tomatoes have a firm, shiny skin with no wrinkles or blemishes.
STORING // Tomatoes store well at room temperature but if you need to store them for longer, you can store them in your fridge.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // If stored in the fridge, bring to room temperature before slicing. Wash and eat all of the tomato except the stem.

Turnips

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Turnips are an excellent source of vitamin C and a good source of dietary fibre.
SELECTING // Select well-rounded, smooth skinned turnips. Check stem end for deterioration or softness.
STORING // Store in a cool, dark, well ventilated place. Can be stored in the refrigerator crisper.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Wash and peel. Small turnips can be used whole, but large ones should be cut into chunks.

Watercress

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Watercress are a good source of vitamin C and A, niacin, thiamine, riboflavin and iron.
SELECTING // Choose fresh looking bunches with green firm leaves and stalks.
STORING // Store for a few days in a plastic bag in the crisper section of the refrigerator. To refresh submerge in cold water for 10 minutes.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Tear leaves and use in salads and sandwiches. Use as a garnish with meat dishes.

Witlof

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Witlof is high in vitamin C, is a good source of protein, carbohydrates and potassium.
SELECTING // Look for tightly packed leaves with fresh tips.
STORING // Witlof is best stored away from light. Store in a brown paper bag in the crisper for up to two days.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // To reduce the bitterness, cut the harder inner part of the stem off before cooking.

Zucchini

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Zucchini is an excellent source of vitamin C.
SELECTING // Select firm zucchini with glossy skin.
STORING // Store in a sealed plastic bag in the crisper for up to three days.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Wash and pat dry with a towel. Remove both ends and prepare as desired.

Artichokes

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Artichokes are a good source of vitamin C and thiamine and contain some dietary fibre, calcium, phosphorus, niacin and potassium.
SELECTING // The size of an artichoke does not necessarily indicate quality. Select artichokes with tight, compact, heavy heads that yield slightly to pressure. Leaves should be a green, purple or bronze in colour. Avoid artichokes with opened out, curled or dry looking leaves.
STORING // Globe artichokes should be stored in an airtight plastic bag, in the refrigerator crisper. Store Jerusalem artichokes in a cool, dry place.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Artichokes can be added raw, whole, sliced or quartered to stews, casseroles and soups.

Brussel Sprouts

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Brussels sprouts are packed full of vitamin C. They are also full of vitamin D, folic acid, potassium and vitamin K.
SELECTING // Select brussel sprouts that are firm and slightly springy to the touch
STORING // Brussels sprouts are best kept in the fridge in a perforated plastic bag.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // : A chef's secret is to cut an 'X' in the bottom of the brussel sprout; this helps the core to cook quickly, meaning the entire brussel sprout will be tender and juicy when you eat it.

Cabbage

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Cabbages are packed with vitamin C, dietary fibre and folate.
SELECTING // Look for crisp, brightly coloured cabbages with a subtle sweet smell.
STORING // Store cabbages in a plastic bag in the crisper section of your refrigerator for three to four days.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Green cabbage has a refreshing flavour and crunchy texture, while red cabbage has thicker leaves and a slightly sweeter taste. They can both be substituted for one another in recipes.

Capsicum

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // By weight, green capsicums have twice as much vitamin C as citrus fruit. They are also a great source of vitamin B6, vitamin E, potassium and antioxidants.
SELECTING // Make sure the skin is firm, glossy and bright with no wrinkles, soft spots or blemishes.
STORING // Keep capsicums in the crisper section or in a sealed plastic bag in the fridge for up to 1 week.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Cut in half and remove the seeds and membrane. When preparing the smaller varieties, cut off the top and scoop out the seeds and membrane.

Carrots

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Carrots are an excellent source of vitamin A, a useful source of vitamin C and a good source of dietary fibre.
SELECTING // Select carrots with good colour and no signs of bending or limpness.
STORING // Store unwashed in and airtight plastic bag in the refrigerator crisper.
AVAILABLE AT // Wetherill Park,Leichhardt,Penrith
PREPARING // Wash in cold water, peel thinly or use unpeeled. Trim the top and tail. Use whole, sliced, diced, julienned or grated in casseroles, soups, salads or cakes.

Celeriac

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // A very good source of dietary fibre and a good source of vitamin C.
SELECTING // Look for stalks and leaves that have a fresh appearance and tubers which are firm, clean and free from damage.
STORING // Cut stalks from tuber and place in an airtight plastic bag. Store both sections in the refrigerator crisper.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Celeriac is suited to a variety of preparation methods and may be served raw or cooked.

Chillies

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Chillies are high in anti-oxidants and vitamin C.
SELECTING // Look for even-coloured chillies with taut skin.
STORING // Store in the crisper section or in a sealed plastic bag in the fridge for up to one week.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Wear gloves or wash hands thoroughly after chopping and deseeding chillies, as they can irritate your eyes and skin.

Chokos

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Chokos are an excellent source of vitamin C and a good source of dietary fibre.
SELECTING // Choose chokos with brightly coloured skins, free from discolouration or soft patches.
STORING // Store chokos in a plastic bag in the crisper section of the fridge for up to two weeks.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Wear gloves while peeling chokos to avoid the worst of the sticky sap under the skin.

Garlic

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Garlic is a good source of dietary fibre. Garlic is valued for its medicinal qualities, particularly as an antiseptic and a cold/flu deterrent.
SELECTING // Select plump firm bulbs with no sign of bruising or decay.
STORING // Store with onions in a cool dark area. Garlic has a storage life of up to 6 months.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Remove clove from bulb and peel. Use whole, sliced, crushed or finely chopped.

Ginger

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // A good source of dietary fibre and vitamin B1.
SELECTING // Look for firm, fresh-looking ginger. It should be pale-brown in colour, with no wrinkled or soft patches
STORING // Store ginger in the crisper section of your fridge for up to two weeks. It can also be wrapped in plastic then frozen for up to 1 month – simply remove and grate as much as you need each time then return to the freezer.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Use a vegetable peeler or small sharp knife to peel away the skin, then chop, slice, grate or juice ginger. You can break a knob off then store the rest for later.

Kohlrabi

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Kohlrabi is an excellent source of vitamin C with some potassium and niacin.
SELECTING // Select smooth, rounded bulbs 8-15cm in diameter. Avoid soft or winkled produce.
STORING // Store in an airtight plastic bag in the refrigerator crisper.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Cut off the base and trim the stalks. Wash thoroughly, cook whole with skin left on. It can be steamed, boiled or microwaved. It can also be peeled and sliced or diced and used in soups or casseroles.

Leeks

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Leeks are a great source vitamin C, iron, folate and fibre.
SELECTING // Look for crisp-looking leeks, with pure white stems.
STORING // Leeks retain their moisture and aroma best when they are in a lightly wrapped plastic bag in the fridge.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Although the entire leek is edible, the tastiest part of the vegetable is the white stalk - the green leaves tend to be stronger and more pungent in taste.

Onions

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Onions contain calcium, iron and potassium.
SELECTING // Select onions which are firm, well-shaped with small necks. Avoid spongy or sprouting onions with uneven or patchy skin colouring.
STORING // It's best to store onions in a cool, dry, dark, open space.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Try placing your onions in the fridge before preparing to reduce the sting when cutting. Peel and discard skin and slice flesh.

Parsnips

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Parsnips are an excellent source of vitamin C and a good source of dietary fibre and folic acid.
SELECTING // Select firm, well formed parsnips with smooth skin and no signs of softness.
STORING // Store in an air tight plastic bag in the refrigerator crisper and use as soon as possible.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Scrub well and trim top and root. Slice thinly, julienne, dice or grate. Serve with dips, use in baked dishes, soups and casseroles.

Peas

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Peas are an excellent source of vitamin C and a good source of vitamin B3, folate and beta carotene.
SELECTING // : Select green peas that are small to medium in size with waxy, plump, bright green pods. Choose bright, crisp snow peas and sugar snap peas. Smaller pods are generally the most tender.
STORING // Store us in a plastic storage bag in the crisper section of the refrigerator. Use within two to three days.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Remove peas from pods unless they’re very young and tender, then the pods can be cooked and eaten too. Slide thumb down pod to split it open from the stem end and remove peas from top to bottom.

Potatoes

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Potatoes are a good source of vitamin C, potassium and dietary fibre.
SELECTING // Select potatoes that have firm, dry skin.
STORING // Store in a cool, dry, dark and well-ventilated place.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Clean with a brush and cook with the skin on, but remove any green sections. If skins have to be removed, peel thinly with a vegetable peeler and cook as soon as peeled.

Radish

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Radish is a source of vitamin C.
SELECTING // Select radishes with smooth skin that are free from splits or brown patches.
STORING // Remove the leaves and store in the fridge for up to one week.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Trim off the leaves and the root, then wash in cool water. Slice as desired.

Silverbeets

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // A good source of dietary fibre, folic acid, and vitamin C. Contains vitamin B6 and riboflavin and is low in sodium.
SELECTING // Select silverbeet with fresh, dark green, crisp leaves and stalks. Avoid leaves that are wilted or scarred.
STORING // Cut off a large section of white stalk, and store stalks and leaves in an airtight plastic bag in the refrigerator crisper.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Trim and remove stalks. Wash leaves and slice. Use in stir-fries, steamed, pureed, combined in quiches, pies or filo parcels.

Spring Onion/Eschallots

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Spring onions are a good source of vitamin C and dietary fibre.
SELECTING // Select eschallots that are medium-sized with fresh looking green leaves that don’t droop too much.
STORING // Refrigerate unwashed, store in a plastic bag or wrap in plastic.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Strip away outside leaves and chop off root.

Squash

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Squash are a good source of vitamin C.
SELECTING // Make sure the squash have a glossy yellow colour and are firm to the touch.
STORING // Squash are best stored in an airtight plastic bag in the refrigerator crisper.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Simply wash and cook whole, sliced or cut into wedges.

Swede

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Swedes are an excellent source of vitamin C and a good source of dietary fibre.
SELECTING // Select well rounded, smooth skinned swedes. Check stem end for deterioration or softness.
STORING // Store swedes in a cool, slightly damp place out of direct sunlight. Unwashed swedes will keep for several months. Avoid putting the 'roots' in the fridge, but the greens will chill for a couple of days.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Wash and peel.

Sweet Potato

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Sweet Potato are an excellent source of vitamin C, a good source of complex carbohydrate, folic acid, vitamin E, potassium and dietary fibre when consumed with the skin on. Orange and yellow varieties are an excellent source of vitamin A.
SELECTING // Choose clean, smooth, well shaped sweet potato.
STORING // Store in a cool, dark, well ventilated place.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Wash and scrub. There is no need to peel.

Sweetcorn

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Corn is an excellent source of dietary fibre and a good source of of potassium.
SELECTING // Buy corn in its husk for freshness and the best flavour. Look for husks that are bright green with white silky threads.
STORING // Store in its husk in the fridge. Corn is best enjoyed within 2 days of purchasing.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Remove the husks and silk just before cooking. To remove the kernels, use a knife to cut down the length of the corn.

Tomatoes

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Tomatoes are high in vitamin C and vitamin A.
SELECTING // Pick tomatoes that are plump and heavy for their size. Also, make sure the tomatoes have a firm, shiny skin with no wrinkles or blemishes.
STORING // Tomatoes store well at room temperature but if you need to store them for longer, you can store them in your fridge.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // If stored in the fridge, bring to room temperature before slicing. Wash and eat all of the tomato except the stem.

Turnips

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Turnips are an excellent source of vitamin C and a good source of dietary fibre.
SELECTING // Select well-rounded, smooth skinned turnips. Check stem end for deterioration or softness.
STORING // Store in a cool, dark, well ventilated place. Can be stored in the refrigerator crisper.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Wash and peel. Small turnips can be used whole, but large ones should be cut into chunks.

Watercress

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Watercress are a good source of vitamin C and A, niacin, thiamine, riboflavin and iron.
SELECTING // Choose fresh looking bunches with green firm leaves and stalks.
STORING // Store for a few days in a plastic bag in the crisper section of the refrigerator. To refresh submerge in cold water for 10 minutes.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Tear leaves and use in salads and sandwiches. Use as a garnish with meat dishes.

Witlof

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Witlof is high in vitamin C, is a good source of protein, carbohydrates and potassium.
SELECTING // Look for tightly packed leaves with fresh tips.
STORING // Witlof is best stored away from light. Store in a brown paper bag in the crisper for up to two days.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // To reduce the bitterness, cut the harder inner part of the stem off before cooking.

Zucchini

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Zucchini is an excellent source of vitamin C.
SELECTING // Select firm zucchini with glossy skin.
STORING // Store in a sealed plastic bag in the crisper for up to three days.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Wash and pat dry with a towel. Remove both ends and prepare as desired.

Artichokes

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Artichokes are a good source of vitamin C and thiamine and contain some dietary fibre, calcium, phosphorus, niacin and potassium.
SELECTING // The size of an artichoke does not necessarily indicate quality. Select artichokes with tight, compact, heavy heads that yield slightly to pressure. Leaves should be a green, purple or bronze in colour. Avoid artichokes with opened out, curled or dry looking leaves.
STORING // Globe artichokes should be stored in an airtight plastic bag, in the refrigerator crisper. Store Jerusalem artichokes in a cool, dry place.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Artichokes can be added raw, whole, sliced or quartered to stews, casseroles and soups.

Brussel Sprouts

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Brussels sprouts are packed full of vitamin C. They are also full of vitamin D, folic acid, potassium and vitamin K.
SELECTING // Select brussel sprouts that are firm and slightly springy to the touch
STORING // Brussels sprouts are best kept in the fridge in a perforated plastic bag.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // : A chef's secret is to cut an 'X' in the bottom of the brussel sprout; this helps the core to cook quickly, meaning the entire brussel sprout will be tender and juicy when you eat it.

Cabbage

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Cabbages are packed with vitamin C, dietary fibre and folate.
SELECTING // Look for crisp, brightly coloured cabbages with a subtle sweet smell.
STORING // Store cabbages in a plastic bag in the crisper section of your refrigerator for three to four days.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Green cabbage has a refreshing flavour and crunchy texture, while red cabbage has thicker leaves and a slightly sweeter taste. They can both be substituted for one another in recipes.

Capsicum

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // By weight, green capsicums have twice as much vitamin C as citrus fruit. They are also a great source of vitamin B6, vitamin E, potassium and antioxidants.
SELECTING // Make sure the skin is firm, glossy and bright with no wrinkles, soft spots or blemishes.
STORING // Keep capsicums in the crisper section or in a sealed plastic bag in the fridge for up to 1 week.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Cut in half and remove the seeds and membrane. When preparing the smaller varieties, cut off the top and scoop out the seeds and membrane.

Carrots

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Carrots are an excellent source of vitamin A, a useful source of vitamin C and a good source of dietary fibre.
SELECTING // Select carrots with good colour and no signs of bending or limpness.
STORING // Store unwashed in and airtight plastic bag in the refrigerator crisper.
AVAILABLE AT // Wetherill Park,Leichhardt,Penrith
PREPARING // Wash in cold water, peel thinly or use unpeeled. Trim the top and tail. Use whole, sliced, diced, julienned or grated in casseroles, soups, salads or cakes.

Celeriac

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // A very good source of dietary fibre and a good source of vitamin C.
SELECTING // Look for stalks and leaves that have a fresh appearance and tubers which are firm, clean and free from damage.
STORING // Cut stalks from tuber and place in an airtight plastic bag. Store both sections in the refrigerator crisper.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Celeriac is suited to a variety of preparation methods and may be served raw or cooked.

Chillies

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Chillies are high in anti-oxidants and vitamin C.
SELECTING // Look for even-coloured chillies with taut skin.
STORING // Store in the crisper section or in a sealed plastic bag in the fridge for up to one week.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Wear gloves or wash hands thoroughly after chopping and deseeding chillies, as they can irritate your eyes and skin.

Chokos

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Chokos are an excellent source of vitamin C and a good source of dietary fibre.
SELECTING // Choose chokos with brightly coloured skins, free from discolouration or soft patches.
STORING // Store chokos in a plastic bag in the crisper section of the fridge for up to two weeks.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Wear gloves while peeling chokos to avoid the worst of the sticky sap under the skin.

Garlic

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Garlic is a good source of dietary fibre. Garlic is valued for its medicinal qualities, particularly as an antiseptic and a cold/flu deterrent.
SELECTING // Select plump firm bulbs with no sign of bruising or decay.
STORING // Store with onions in a cool dark area. Garlic has a storage life of up to 6 months.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Remove clove from bulb and peel. Use whole, sliced, crushed or finely chopped.

Ginger

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // A good source of dietary fibre and vitamin B1.
SELECTING // Look for firm, fresh-looking ginger. It should be pale-brown in colour, with no wrinkled or soft patches
STORING // Store ginger in the crisper section of your fridge for up to two weeks. It can also be wrapped in plastic then frozen for up to 1 month – simply remove and grate as much as you need each time then return to the freezer.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Use a vegetable peeler or small sharp knife to peel away the skin, then chop, slice, grate or juice ginger. You can break a knob off then store the rest for later.

Kohlrabi

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Kohlrabi is an excellent source of vitamin C with some potassium and niacin.
SELECTING // Select smooth, rounded bulbs 8-15cm in diameter. Avoid soft or winkled produce.
STORING // Store in an airtight plastic bag in the refrigerator crisper.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Cut off the base and trim the stalks. Wash thoroughly, cook whole with skin left on. It can be steamed, boiled or microwaved. It can also be peeled and sliced or diced and used in soups or casseroles.

Leeks

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Leeks are a great source vitamin C, iron, folate and fibre.
SELECTING // Look for crisp-looking leeks, with pure white stems.
STORING // Leeks retain their moisture and aroma best when they are in a lightly wrapped plastic bag in the fridge.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Although the entire leek is edible, the tastiest part of the vegetable is the white stalk - the green leaves tend to be stronger and more pungent in taste.

Onions

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Onions contain calcium, iron and potassium.
SELECTING // Select onions which are firm, well-shaped with small necks. Avoid spongy or sprouting onions with uneven or patchy skin colouring.
STORING // It's best to store onions in a cool, dry, dark, open space.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Try placing your onions in the fridge before preparing to reduce the sting when cutting. Peel and discard skin and slice flesh.

Parsnips

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Parsnips are an excellent source of vitamin C and a good source of dietary fibre and folic acid.
SELECTING // Select firm, well formed parsnips with smooth skin and no signs of softness.
STORING // Store in an air tight plastic bag in the refrigerator crisper and use as soon as possible.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Scrub well and trim top and root. Slice thinly, julienne, dice or grate. Serve with dips, use in baked dishes, soups and casseroles.

Peas

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Peas are an excellent source of vitamin C and a good source of vitamin B3, folate and beta carotene.
SELECTING // : Select green peas that are small to medium in size with waxy, plump, bright green pods. Choose bright, crisp snow peas and sugar snap peas. Smaller pods are generally the most tender.
STORING // Store us in a plastic storage bag in the crisper section of the refrigerator. Use within two to three days.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Remove peas from pods unless they’re very young and tender, then the pods can be cooked and eaten too. Slide thumb down pod to split it open from the stem end and remove peas from top to bottom.

Potatoes

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Potatoes are a good source of vitamin C, potassium and dietary fibre.
SELECTING // Select potatoes that have firm, dry skin.
STORING // Store in a cool, dry, dark and well-ventilated place.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Clean with a brush and cook with the skin on, but remove any green sections. If skins have to be removed, peel thinly with a vegetable peeler and cook as soon as peeled.

Radish

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Radish is a source of vitamin C.
SELECTING // Select radishes with smooth skin that are free from splits or brown patches.
STORING // Remove the leaves and store in the fridge for up to one week.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Trim off the leaves and the root, then wash in cool water. Slice as desired.

Silverbeets

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // A good source of dietary fibre, folic acid, and vitamin C. Contains vitamin B6 and riboflavin and is low in sodium.
SELECTING // Select silverbeet with fresh, dark green, crisp leaves and stalks. Avoid leaves that are wilted or scarred.
STORING // Cut off a large section of white stalk, and store stalks and leaves in an airtight plastic bag in the refrigerator crisper.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Trim and remove stalks. Wash leaves and slice. Use in stir-fries, steamed, pureed, combined in quiches, pies or filo parcels.

Spring Onion/Eschallots

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Spring onions are a good source of vitamin C and dietary fibre.
SELECTING // Select eschallots that are medium-sized with fresh looking green leaves that don’t droop too much.
STORING // Refrigerate unwashed, store in a plastic bag or wrap in plastic.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Strip away outside leaves and chop off root.

Squash

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Squash are a good source of vitamin C.
SELECTING // Make sure the squash have a glossy yellow colour and are firm to the touch.
STORING // Squash are best stored in an airtight plastic bag in the refrigerator crisper.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Simply wash and cook whole, sliced or cut into wedges.

Swede

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Swedes are an excellent source of vitamin C and a good source of dietary fibre.
SELECTING // Select well rounded, smooth skinned swedes. Check stem end for deterioration or softness.
STORING // Store swedes in a cool, slightly damp place out of direct sunlight. Unwashed swedes will keep for several months. Avoid putting the 'roots' in the fridge, but the greens will chill for a couple of days.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Wash and peel.

Sweet Potato

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Sweet Potato are an excellent source of vitamin C, a good source of complex carbohydrate, folic acid, vitamin E, potassium and dietary fibre when consumed with the skin on. Orange and yellow varieties are an excellent source of vitamin A.
SELECTING // Choose clean, smooth, well shaped sweet potato.
STORING // Store in a cool, dark, well ventilated place.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Wash and scrub. There is no need to peel.

Sweetcorn

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Corn is an excellent source of dietary fibre and a good source of of potassium.
SELECTING // Buy corn in its husk for freshness and the best flavour. Look for husks that are bright green with white silky threads.
STORING // Store in its husk in the fridge. Corn is best enjoyed within 2 days of purchasing.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Remove the husks and silk just before cooking. To remove the kernels, use a knife to cut down the length of the corn.

Tomatoes

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Tomatoes are high in vitamin C and vitamin A.
SELECTING // Pick tomatoes that are plump and heavy for their size. Also, make sure the tomatoes have a firm, shiny skin with no wrinkles or blemishes.
STORING // Tomatoes store well at room temperature but if you need to store them for longer, you can store them in your fridge.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // If stored in the fridge, bring to room temperature before slicing. Wash and eat all of the tomato except the stem.

Turnips

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Turnips are an excellent source of vitamin C and a good source of dietary fibre.
SELECTING // Select well-rounded, smooth skinned turnips. Check stem end for deterioration or softness.
STORING // Store in a cool, dark, well ventilated place. Can be stored in the refrigerator crisper.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Wash and peel. Small turnips can be used whole, but large ones should be cut into chunks.

Watercress

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Watercress are a good source of vitamin C and A, niacin, thiamine, riboflavin and iron.
SELECTING // Choose fresh looking bunches with green firm leaves and stalks.
STORING // Store for a few days in a plastic bag in the crisper section of the refrigerator. To refresh submerge in cold water for 10 minutes.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Tear leaves and use in salads and sandwiches. Use as a garnish with meat dishes.

Witlof

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Witlof is high in vitamin C, is a good source of protein, carbohydrates and potassium.
SELECTING // Look for tightly packed leaves with fresh tips.
STORING // Witlof is best stored away from light. Store in a brown paper bag in the crisper for up to two days.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // To reduce the bitterness, cut the harder inner part of the stem off before cooking.

Zucchini

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Zucchini is an excellent source of vitamin C.
SELECTING // Select firm zucchini with glossy skin.
STORING // Store in a sealed plastic bag in the crisper for up to three days.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Wash and pat dry with a towel. Remove both ends and prepare as desired.

Artichokes

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Artichokes are a good source of vitamin C and thiamine and contain some dietary fibre, calcium, phosphorus, niacin and potassium.
SELECTING // The size of an artichoke does not necessarily indicate quality. Select artichokes with tight, compact, heavy heads that yield slightly to pressure. Leaves should be a green, purple or bronze in colour. Avoid artichokes with opened out, curled or dry looking leaves.
STORING // Globe artichokes should be stored in an airtight plastic bag, in the refrigerator crisper. Store Jerusalem artichokes in a cool, dry place.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Artichokes can be added raw, whole, sliced or quartered to stews, casseroles and soups.

Brussel Sprouts

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Brussels sprouts are packed full of vitamin C. They are also full of vitamin D, folic acid, potassium and vitamin K.
SELECTING // Select brussel sprouts that are firm and slightly springy to the touch
STORING // Brussels sprouts are best kept in the fridge in a perforated plastic bag.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // : A chef's secret is to cut an 'X' in the bottom of the brussel sprout; this helps the core to cook quickly, meaning the entire brussel sprout will be tender and juicy when you eat it.

Cabbage

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Cabbages are packed with vitamin C, dietary fibre and folate.
SELECTING // Look for crisp, brightly coloured cabbages with a subtle sweet smell.
STORING // Store cabbages in a plastic bag in the crisper section of your refrigerator for three to four days.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Green cabbage has a refreshing flavour and crunchy texture, while red cabbage has thicker leaves and a slightly sweeter taste. They can both be substituted for one another in recipes.

Capsicum

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // By weight, green capsicums have twice as much vitamin C as citrus fruit. They are also a great source of vitamin B6, vitamin E, potassium and antioxidants.
SELECTING // Make sure the skin is firm, glossy and bright with no wrinkles, soft spots or blemishes.
STORING // Keep capsicums in the crisper section or in a sealed plastic bag in the fridge for up to 1 week.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Cut in half and remove the seeds and membrane. When preparing the smaller varieties, cut off the top and scoop out the seeds and membrane.

Carrots

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Carrots are an excellent source of vitamin A, a useful source of vitamin C and a good source of dietary fibre.
SELECTING // Select carrots with good colour and no signs of bending or limpness.
STORING // Store unwashed in and airtight plastic bag in the refrigerator crisper.
AVAILABLE AT // Wetherill Park,Leichhardt,Penrith
PREPARING // Wash in cold water, peel thinly or use unpeeled. Trim the top and tail. Use whole, sliced, diced, julienned or grated in casseroles, soups, salads or cakes.

Celeriac

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // A very good source of dietary fibre and a good source of vitamin C.
SELECTING // Look for stalks and leaves that have a fresh appearance and tubers which are firm, clean and free from damage.
STORING // Cut stalks from tuber and place in an airtight plastic bag. Store both sections in the refrigerator crisper.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Celeriac is suited to a variety of preparation methods and may be served raw or cooked.

Chillies

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Chillies are high in anti-oxidants and vitamin C.
SELECTING // Look for even-coloured chillies with taut skin.
STORING // Store in the crisper section or in a sealed plastic bag in the fridge for up to one week.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Wear gloves or wash hands thoroughly after chopping and deseeding chillies, as they can irritate your eyes and skin.

Chokos

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Chokos are an excellent source of vitamin C and a good source of dietary fibre.
SELECTING // Choose chokos with brightly coloured skins, free from discolouration or soft patches.
STORING // Store chokos in a plastic bag in the crisper section of the fridge for up to two weeks.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Wear gloves while peeling chokos to avoid the worst of the sticky sap under the skin.

Garlic

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Garlic is a good source of dietary fibre. Garlic is valued for its medicinal qualities, particularly as an antiseptic and a cold/flu deterrent.
SELECTING // Select plump firm bulbs with no sign of bruising or decay.
STORING // Store with onions in a cool dark area. Garlic has a storage life of up to 6 months.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Remove clove from bulb and peel. Use whole, sliced, crushed or finely chopped.

Ginger

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // A good source of dietary fibre and vitamin B1.
SELECTING // Look for firm, fresh-looking ginger. It should be pale-brown in colour, with no wrinkled or soft patches
STORING // Store ginger in the crisper section of your fridge for up to two weeks. It can also be wrapped in plastic then frozen for up to 1 month – simply remove and grate as much as you need each time then return to the freezer.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Use a vegetable peeler or small sharp knife to peel away the skin, then chop, slice, grate or juice ginger. You can break a knob off then store the rest for later.

Kohlrabi

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Kohlrabi is an excellent source of vitamin C with some potassium and niacin.
SELECTING // Select smooth, rounded bulbs 8-15cm in diameter. Avoid soft or winkled produce.
STORING // Store in an airtight plastic bag in the refrigerator crisper.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Cut off the base and trim the stalks. Wash thoroughly, cook whole with skin left on. It can be steamed, boiled or microwaved. It can also be peeled and sliced or diced and used in soups or casseroles.

Leeks

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Leeks are a great source vitamin C, iron, folate and fibre.
SELECTING // Look for crisp-looking leeks, with pure white stems.
STORING // Leeks retain their moisture and aroma best when they are in a lightly wrapped plastic bag in the fridge.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Although the entire leek is edible, the tastiest part of the vegetable is the white stalk - the green leaves tend to be stronger and more pungent in taste.

Okra

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Okra are a good source of dietary fibre, vitamin C, iron, calcium, potassium and B6.
SELECTING // Select okra that are small in size and avoid any that are soft or have brown spots.
STORING // Store in a plastic bag in the fridge for up to 4 days.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Cut and discard tops and tails.

Onions

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Onions contain calcium, iron and potassium.
SELECTING // Select onions which are firm, well-shaped with small necks. Avoid spongy or sprouting onions with uneven or patchy skin colouring.
STORING // It's best to store onions in a cool, dry, dark, open space.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Try placing your onions in the fridge before preparing to reduce the sting when cutting. Peel and discard skin and slice flesh.

Parsnips

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Parsnips are an excellent source of vitamin C and a good source of dietary fibre and folic acid.
SELECTING // Select firm, well formed parsnips with smooth skin and no signs of softness.
STORING // Store in an air tight plastic bag in the refrigerator crisper and use as soon as possible.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Scrub well and trim top and root. Slice thinly, julienne, dice or grate. Serve with dips, use in baked dishes, soups and casseroles.

Peas

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Peas are an excellent source of vitamin C and a good source of vitamin B3, folate and beta carotene.
SELECTING // : Select green peas that are small to medium in size with waxy, plump, bright green pods. Choose bright, crisp snow peas and sugar snap peas. Smaller pods are generally the most tender.
STORING // Store us in a plastic storage bag in the crisper section of the refrigerator. Use within two to three days.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Remove peas from pods unless they’re very young and tender, then the pods can be cooked and eaten too. Slide thumb down pod to split it open from the stem end and remove peas from top to bottom.

Potatoes

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Potatoes are a good source of vitamin C, potassium and dietary fibre.
SELECTING // Select potatoes that have firm, dry skin.
STORING // Store in a cool, dry, dark and well-ventilated place.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Clean with a brush and cook with the skin on, but remove any green sections. If skins have to be removed, peel thinly with a vegetable peeler and cook as soon as peeled.

Radish

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Radish is a source of vitamin C.
SELECTING // Select radishes with smooth skin that are free from splits or brown patches.
STORING // Remove the leaves and store in the fridge for up to one week.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Trim off the leaves and the root, then wash in cool water. Slice as desired.

Silverbeets

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // A good source of dietary fibre, folic acid, and vitamin C. Contains vitamin B6 and riboflavin and is low in sodium.
SELECTING // Select silverbeet with fresh, dark green, crisp leaves and stalks. Avoid leaves that are wilted or scarred.
STORING // Cut off a large section of white stalk, and store stalks and leaves in an airtight plastic bag in the refrigerator crisper.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Trim and remove stalks. Wash leaves and slice. Use in stir-fries, steamed, pureed, combined in quiches, pies or filo parcels.

Spring Onion/Eschallots

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Spring onions are a good source of vitamin C and dietary fibre.
SELECTING // Select eschallots that are medium-sized with fresh looking green leaves that don’t droop too much.
STORING // Refrigerate unwashed, store in a plastic bag or wrap in plastic.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Strip away outside leaves and chop off root.

Squash

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Squash are a good source of vitamin C.
SELECTING // Make sure the squash have a glossy yellow colour and are firm to the touch.
STORING // Squash are best stored in an airtight plastic bag in the refrigerator crisper.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Simply wash and cook whole, sliced or cut into wedges.

Swede

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Swedes are an excellent source of vitamin C and a good source of dietary fibre.
SELECTING // Select well rounded, smooth skinned swedes. Check stem end for deterioration or softness.
STORING // Store swedes in a cool, slightly damp place out of direct sunlight. Unwashed swedes will keep for several months. Avoid putting the 'roots' in the fridge, but the greens will chill for a couple of days.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Wash and peel.

Sweet Potato

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Sweet Potato are an excellent source of vitamin C, a good source of complex carbohydrate, folic acid, vitamin E, potassium and dietary fibre when consumed with the skin on. Orange and yellow varieties are an excellent source of vitamin A.
SELECTING // Choose clean, smooth, well shaped sweet potato.
STORING // Store in a cool, dark, well ventilated place.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Wash and scrub. There is no need to peel.

Sweetcorn

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Corn is an excellent source of dietary fibre and a good source of of potassium.
SELECTING // Buy corn in its husk for freshness and the best flavour. Look for husks that are bright green with white silky threads.
STORING // Store in its husk in the fridge. Corn is best enjoyed within 2 days of purchasing.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Remove the husks and silk just before cooking. To remove the kernels, use a knife to cut down the length of the corn.

Tomatoes

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Tomatoes are high in vitamin C and vitamin A.
SELECTING // Pick tomatoes that are plump and heavy for their size. Also, make sure the tomatoes have a firm, shiny skin with no wrinkles or blemishes.
STORING // Tomatoes store well at room temperature but if you need to store them for longer, you can store them in your fridge.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // If stored in the fridge, bring to room temperature before slicing. Wash and eat all of the tomato except the stem.

Turnips

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Turnips are an excellent source of vitamin C and a good source of dietary fibre.
SELECTING // Select well-rounded, smooth skinned turnips. Check stem end for deterioration or softness.
STORING // Store in a cool, dark, well ventilated place. Can be stored in the refrigerator crisper.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Wash and peel. Small turnips can be used whole, but large ones should be cut into chunks.

Watercress

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Watercress are a good source of vitamin C and A, niacin, thiamine, riboflavin and iron.
SELECTING // Choose fresh looking bunches with green firm leaves and stalks.
STORING // Store for a few days in a plastic bag in the crisper section of the refrigerator. To refresh submerge in cold water for 10 minutes.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Tear leaves and use in salads and sandwiches. Use as a garnish with meat dishes.

Witlof

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Witlof is high in vitamin C, is a good source of protein, carbohydrates and potassium.
SELECTING // Look for tightly packed leaves with fresh tips.
STORING // Witlof is best stored away from light. Store in a brown paper bag in the crisper for up to two days.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // To reduce the bitterness, cut the harder inner part of the stem off before cooking.

Zucchini

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Zucchini is an excellent source of vitamin C.
SELECTING // Select firm zucchini with glossy skin.
STORING // Store in a sealed plastic bag in the crisper for up to three days.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Wash and pat dry with a towel. Remove both ends and prepare as desired.

Artichokes

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Artichokes are a good source of vitamin C and thiamine and contain some dietary fibre, calcium, phosphorus, niacin and potassium.
SELECTING // The size of an artichoke does not necessarily indicate quality. Select artichokes with tight, compact, heavy heads that yield slightly to pressure. Leaves should be a green, purple or bronze in colour. Avoid artichokes with opened out, curled or dry looking leaves.
STORING // Globe artichokes should be stored in an airtight plastic bag, in the refrigerator crisper. Store Jerusalem artichokes in a cool, dry place.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Artichokes can be added raw, whole, sliced or quartered to stews, casseroles and soups.

Brussel Sprouts

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Brussels sprouts are packed full of vitamin C. They are also full of vitamin D, folic acid, potassium and vitamin K.
SELECTING // Select brussel sprouts that are firm and slightly springy to the touch
STORING // Brussels sprouts are best kept in the fridge in a perforated plastic bag.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // : A chef's secret is to cut an 'X' in the bottom of the brussel sprout; this helps the core to cook quickly, meaning the entire brussel sprout will be tender and juicy when you eat it.

Cabbage

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Cabbages are packed with vitamin C, dietary fibre and folate.
SELECTING // Look for crisp, brightly coloured cabbages with a subtle sweet smell.
STORING // Store cabbages in a plastic bag in the crisper section of your refrigerator for three to four days.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Green cabbage has a refreshing flavour and crunchy texture, while red cabbage has thicker leaves and a slightly sweeter taste. They can both be substituted for one another in recipes.

Capsicum

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // By weight, green capsicums have twice as much vitamin C as citrus fruit. They are also a great source of vitamin B6, vitamin E, potassium and antioxidants.
SELECTING // Make sure the skin is firm, glossy and bright with no wrinkles, soft spots or blemishes.
STORING // Keep capsicums in the crisper section or in a sealed plastic bag in the fridge for up to 1 week.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Cut in half and remove the seeds and membrane. When preparing the smaller varieties, cut off the top and scoop out the seeds and membrane.

Carrots

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Carrots are an excellent source of vitamin A, a useful source of vitamin C and a good source of dietary fibre.
SELECTING // Select carrots with good colour and no signs of bending or limpness.
STORING // Store unwashed in and airtight plastic bag in the refrigerator crisper.
AVAILABLE AT // Wetherill Park,Leichhardt,Penrith
PREPARING // Wash in cold water, peel thinly or use unpeeled. Trim the top and tail. Use whole, sliced, diced, julienned or grated in casseroles, soups, salads or cakes.

Celeriac

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // A very good source of dietary fibre and a good source of vitamin C.
SELECTING // Look for stalks and leaves that have a fresh appearance and tubers which are firm, clean and free from damage.
STORING // Cut stalks from tuber and place in an airtight plastic bag. Store both sections in the refrigerator crisper.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Celeriac is suited to a variety of preparation methods and may be served raw or cooked.

Chillies

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Chillies are high in anti-oxidants and vitamin C.
SELECTING // Look for even-coloured chillies with taut skin.
STORING // Store in the crisper section or in a sealed plastic bag in the fridge for up to one week.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Wear gloves or wash hands thoroughly after chopping and deseeding chillies, as they can irritate your eyes and skin.

Chokos

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Chokos are an excellent source of vitamin C and a good source of dietary fibre.
SELECTING // Choose chokos with brightly coloured skins, free from discolouration or soft patches.
STORING // Store chokos in a plastic bag in the crisper section of the fridge for up to two weeks.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Wear gloves while peeling chokos to avoid the worst of the sticky sap under the skin.

Garlic

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Garlic is a good source of dietary fibre. Garlic is valued for its medicinal qualities, particularly as an antiseptic and a cold/flu deterrent.
SELECTING // Select plump firm bulbs with no sign of bruising or decay.
STORING // Store with onions in a cool dark area. Garlic has a storage life of up to 6 months.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Remove clove from bulb and peel. Use whole, sliced, crushed or finely chopped.

Ginger

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // A good source of dietary fibre and vitamin B1.
SELECTING // Look for firm, fresh-looking ginger. It should be pale-brown in colour, with no wrinkled or soft patches
STORING // Store ginger in the crisper section of your fridge for up to two weeks. It can also be wrapped in plastic then frozen for up to 1 month – simply remove and grate as much as you need each time then return to the freezer.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Use a vegetable peeler or small sharp knife to peel away the skin, then chop, slice, grate or juice ginger. You can break a knob off then store the rest for later.

Kohlrabi

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Kohlrabi is an excellent source of vitamin C with some potassium and niacin.
SELECTING // Select smooth, rounded bulbs 8-15cm in diameter. Avoid soft or winkled produce.
STORING // Store in an airtight plastic bag in the refrigerator crisper.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Cut off the base and trim the stalks. Wash thoroughly, cook whole with skin left on. It can be steamed, boiled or microwaved. It can also be peeled and sliced or diced and used in soups or casseroles.

Leeks

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Leeks are a great source vitamin C, iron, folate and fibre.
SELECTING // Look for crisp-looking leeks, with pure white stems.
STORING // Leeks retain their moisture and aroma best when they are in a lightly wrapped plastic bag in the fridge.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Although the entire leek is edible, the tastiest part of the vegetable is the white stalk - the green leaves tend to be stronger and more pungent in taste.

Okra

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Okra are a good source of dietary fibre, vitamin C, iron, calcium, potassium and B6.
SELECTING // Select okra that are small in size and avoid any that are soft or have brown spots.
STORING // Store in a plastic bag in the fridge for up to 4 days.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Cut and discard tops and tails.

Onions

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Onions contain calcium, iron and potassium.
SELECTING // Select onions which are firm, well-shaped with small necks. Avoid spongy or sprouting onions with uneven or patchy skin colouring.
STORING // It's best to store onions in a cool, dry, dark, open space.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Try placing your onions in the fridge before preparing to reduce the sting when cutting. Peel and discard skin and slice flesh.

Parsnips

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Parsnips are an excellent source of vitamin C and a good source of dietary fibre and folic acid.
SELECTING // Select firm, well formed parsnips with smooth skin and no signs of softness.
STORING // Store in an air tight plastic bag in the refrigerator crisper and use as soon as possible.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Scrub well and trim top and root. Slice thinly, julienne, dice or grate. Serve with dips, use in baked dishes, soups and casseroles.

Peas

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Peas are an excellent source of vitamin C and a good source of vitamin B3, folate and beta carotene.
SELECTING // : Select green peas that are small to medium in size with waxy, plump, bright green pods. Choose bright, crisp snow peas and sugar snap peas. Smaller pods are generally the most tender.
STORING // Store us in a plastic storage bag in the crisper section of the refrigerator. Use within two to three days.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Remove peas from pods unless they’re very young and tender, then the pods can be cooked and eaten too. Slide thumb down pod to split it open from the stem end and remove peas from top to bottom.

Potatoes

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Potatoes are a good source of vitamin C, potassium and dietary fibre.
SELECTING // Select potatoes that have firm, dry skin.
STORING // Store in a cool, dry, dark and well-ventilated place.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Clean with a brush and cook with the skin on, but remove any green sections. If skins have to be removed, peel thinly with a vegetable peeler and cook as soon as peeled.

Radish

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Radish is a source of vitamin C.
SELECTING // Select radishes with smooth skin that are free from splits or brown patches.
STORING // Remove the leaves and store in the fridge for up to one week.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Trim off the leaves and the root, then wash in cool water. Slice as desired.

Silverbeets

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // A good source of dietary fibre, folic acid, and vitamin C. Contains vitamin B6 and riboflavin and is low in sodium.
SELECTING // Select silverbeet with fresh, dark green, crisp leaves and stalks. Avoid leaves that are wilted or scarred.
STORING // Cut off a large section of white stalk, and store stalks and leaves in an airtight plastic bag in the refrigerator crisper.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Trim and remove stalks. Wash leaves and slice. Use in stir-fries, steamed, pureed, combined in quiches, pies or filo parcels.

Spring Onion/Eschallots

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Spring onions are a good source of vitamin C and dietary fibre.
SELECTING // Select eschallots that are medium-sized with fresh looking green leaves that don’t droop too much.
STORING // Refrigerate unwashed, store in a plastic bag or wrap in plastic.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Strip away outside leaves and chop off root.

Squash

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Squash are a good source of vitamin C.
SELECTING // Make sure the squash have a glossy yellow colour and are firm to the touch.
STORING // Squash are best stored in an airtight plastic bag in the refrigerator crisper.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Simply wash and cook whole, sliced or cut into wedges.

Swede

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Swedes are an excellent source of vitamin C and a good source of dietary fibre.
SELECTING // Select well rounded, smooth skinned swedes. Check stem end for deterioration or softness.
STORING // Store swedes in a cool, slightly damp place out of direct sunlight. Unwashed swedes will keep for several months. Avoid putting the 'roots' in the fridge, but the greens will chill for a couple of days.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Wash and peel.

Sweet Potato

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Sweet Potato are an excellent source of vitamin C, a good source of complex carbohydrate, folic acid, vitamin E, potassium and dietary fibre when consumed with the skin on. Orange and yellow varieties are an excellent source of vitamin A.
SELECTING // Choose clean, smooth, well shaped sweet potato.
STORING // Store in a cool, dark, well ventilated place.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Wash and scrub. There is no need to peel.

Sweetcorn

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Corn is an excellent source of dietary fibre and a good source of of potassium.
SELECTING // Buy corn in its husk for freshness and the best flavour. Look for husks that are bright green with white silky threads.
STORING // Store in its husk in the fridge. Corn is best enjoyed within 2 days of purchasing.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Remove the husks and silk just before cooking. To remove the kernels, use a knife to cut down the length of the corn.

Tomatoes

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Tomatoes are high in vitamin C and vitamin A.
SELECTING // Pick tomatoes that are plump and heavy for their size. Also, make sure the tomatoes have a firm, shiny skin with no wrinkles or blemishes.
STORING // Tomatoes store well at room temperature but if you need to store them for longer, you can store them in your fridge.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // If stored in the fridge, bring to room temperature before slicing. Wash and eat all of the tomato except the stem.

Turnips

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Turnips are an excellent source of vitamin C and a good source of dietary fibre.
SELECTING // Select well-rounded, smooth skinned turnips. Check stem end for deterioration or softness.
STORING // Store in a cool, dark, well ventilated place. Can be stored in the refrigerator crisper.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Wash and peel. Small turnips can be used whole, but large ones should be cut into chunks.

Watercress

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Watercress are a good source of vitamin C and A, niacin, thiamine, riboflavin and iron.
SELECTING // Choose fresh looking bunches with green firm leaves and stalks.
STORING // Store for a few days in a plastic bag in the crisper section of the refrigerator. To refresh submerge in cold water for 10 minutes.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Tear leaves and use in salads and sandwiches. Use as a garnish with meat dishes.

Witlof

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Witlof is high in vitamin C, is a good source of protein, carbohydrates and potassium.
SELECTING // Look for tightly packed leaves with fresh tips.
STORING // Witlof is best stored away from light. Store in a brown paper bag in the crisper for up to two days.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // To reduce the bitterness, cut the harder inner part of the stem off before cooking.

Zucchini

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Zucchini is an excellent source of vitamin C.
SELECTING // Select firm zucchini with glossy skin.
STORING // Store in a sealed plastic bag in the crisper for up to three days.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Wash and pat dry with a towel. Remove both ends and prepare as desired.

Artichokes

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Artichokes are a good source of vitamin C and thiamine and contain some dietary fibre, calcium, phosphorus, niacin and potassium.
SELECTING // The size of an artichoke does not necessarily indicate quality. Select artichokes with tight, compact, heavy heads that yield slightly to pressure. Leaves should be a green, purple or bronze in colour. Avoid artichokes with opened out, curled or dry looking leaves.
STORING // Globe artichokes should be stored in an airtight plastic bag, in the refrigerator crisper. Store Jerusalem artichokes in a cool, dry place.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Artichokes can be added raw, whole, sliced or quartered to stews, casseroles and soups.

Brussel Sprouts

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Brussels sprouts are packed full of vitamin C. They are also full of vitamin D, folic acid, potassium and vitamin K.
SELECTING // Select brussel sprouts that are firm and slightly springy to the touch
STORING // Brussels sprouts are best kept in the fridge in a perforated plastic bag.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // : A chef's secret is to cut an 'X' in the bottom of the brussel sprout; this helps the core to cook quickly, meaning the entire brussel sprout will be tender and juicy when you eat it.

Cabbage

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Cabbages are packed with vitamin C, dietary fibre and folate.
SELECTING // Look for crisp, brightly coloured cabbages with a subtle sweet smell.
STORING // Store cabbages in a plastic bag in the crisper section of your refrigerator for three to four days.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Green cabbage has a refreshing flavour and crunchy texture, while red cabbage has thicker leaves and a slightly sweeter taste. They can both be substituted for one another in recipes.

Capsicum

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // By weight, green capsicums have twice as much vitamin C as citrus fruit. They are also a great source of vitamin B6, vitamin E, potassium and antioxidants.
SELECTING // Make sure the skin is firm, glossy and bright with no wrinkles, soft spots or blemishes.
STORING // Keep capsicums in the crisper section or in a sealed plastic bag in the fridge for up to 1 week.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Cut in half and remove the seeds and membrane. When preparing the smaller varieties, cut off the top and scoop out the seeds and membrane.

Carrots

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Carrots are an excellent source of vitamin A, a useful source of vitamin C and a good source of dietary fibre.
SELECTING // Select carrots with good colour and no signs of bending or limpness.
STORING // Store unwashed in and airtight plastic bag in the refrigerator crisper.
AVAILABLE AT // Wetherill Park,Leichhardt,Penrith
PREPARING // Wash in cold water, peel thinly or use unpeeled. Trim the top and tail. Use whole, sliced, diced, julienned or grated in casseroles, soups, salads or cakes.

Celeriac

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // A very good source of dietary fibre and a good source of vitamin C.
SELECTING // Look for stalks and leaves that have a fresh appearance and tubers which are firm, clean and free from damage.
STORING // Cut stalks from tuber and place in an airtight plastic bag. Store both sections in the refrigerator crisper.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Celeriac is suited to a variety of preparation methods and may be served raw or cooked.

Chillies

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Chillies are high in anti-oxidants and vitamin C.
SELECTING // Look for even-coloured chillies with taut skin.
STORING // Store in the crisper section or in a sealed plastic bag in the fridge for up to one week.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Wear gloves or wash hands thoroughly after chopping and deseeding chillies, as they can irritate your eyes and skin.

Chokos

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Chokos are an excellent source of vitamin C and a good source of dietary fibre.
SELECTING // Choose chokos with brightly coloured skins, free from discolouration or soft patches.
STORING // Store chokos in a plastic bag in the crisper section of the fridge for up to two weeks.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Wear gloves while peeling chokos to avoid the worst of the sticky sap under the skin.

Garlic

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Garlic is a good source of dietary fibre. Garlic is valued for its medicinal qualities, particularly as an antiseptic and a cold/flu deterrent.
SELECTING // Select plump firm bulbs with no sign of bruising or decay.
STORING // Store with onions in a cool dark area. Garlic has a storage life of up to 6 months.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Remove clove from bulb and peel. Use whole, sliced, crushed or finely chopped.

Ginger

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // A good source of dietary fibre and vitamin B1.
SELECTING // Look for firm, fresh-looking ginger. It should be pale-brown in colour, with no wrinkled or soft patches
STORING // Store ginger in the crisper section of your fridge for up to two weeks. It can also be wrapped in plastic then frozen for up to 1 month – simply remove and grate as much as you need each time then return to the freezer.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Use a vegetable peeler or small sharp knife to peel away the skin, then chop, slice, grate or juice ginger. You can break a knob off then store the rest for later.

Kohlrabi

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Kohlrabi is an excellent source of vitamin C with some potassium and niacin.
SELECTING // Select smooth, rounded bulbs 8-15cm in diameter. Avoid soft or winkled produce.
STORING // Store in an airtight plastic bag in the refrigerator crisper.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Cut off the base and trim the stalks. Wash thoroughly, cook whole with skin left on. It can be steamed, boiled or microwaved. It can also be peeled and sliced or diced and used in soups or casseroles.

Leeks

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Leeks are a great source vitamin C, iron, folate and fibre.
SELECTING // Look for crisp-looking leeks, with pure white stems.
STORING // Leeks retain their moisture and aroma best when they are in a lightly wrapped plastic bag in the fridge.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Although the entire leek is edible, the tastiest part of the vegetable is the white stalk - the green leaves tend to be stronger and more pungent in taste.

Okra

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Okra are a good source of dietary fibre, vitamin C, iron, calcium, potassium and B6.
SELECTING // Select okra that are small in size and avoid any that are soft or have brown spots.
STORING // Store in a plastic bag in the fridge for up to 4 days.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Cut and discard tops and tails.

Onions

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Onions contain calcium, iron and potassium.
SELECTING // Select onions which are firm, well-shaped with small necks. Avoid spongy or sprouting onions with uneven or patchy skin colouring.
STORING // It's best to store onions in a cool, dry, dark, open space.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Try placing your onions in the fridge before preparing to reduce the sting when cutting. Peel and discard skin and slice flesh.

Parsnips

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Parsnips are an excellent source of vitamin C and a good source of dietary fibre and folic acid.
SELECTING // Select firm, well formed parsnips with smooth skin and no signs of softness.
STORING // Store in an air tight plastic bag in the refrigerator crisper and use as soon as possible.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Scrub well and trim top and root. Slice thinly, julienne, dice or grate. Serve with dips, use in baked dishes, soups and casseroles.

Peas

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Peas are an excellent source of vitamin C and a good source of vitamin B3, folate and beta carotene.
SELECTING // : Select green peas that are small to medium in size with waxy, plump, bright green pods. Choose bright, crisp snow peas and sugar snap peas. Smaller pods are generally the most tender.
STORING // Store us in a plastic storage bag in the crisper section of the refrigerator. Use within two to three days.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Remove peas from pods unless they’re very young and tender, then the pods can be cooked and eaten too. Slide thumb down pod to split it open from the stem end and remove peas from top to bottom.

Potatoes

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Potatoes are a good source of vitamin C, potassium and dietary fibre.
SELECTING // Select potatoes that have firm, dry skin.
STORING // Store in a cool, dry, dark and well-ventilated place.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Clean with a brush and cook with the skin on, but remove any green sections. If skins have to be removed, peel thinly with a vegetable peeler and cook as soon as peeled.

Radish

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Radish is a source of vitamin C.
SELECTING // Select radishes with smooth skin that are free from splits or brown patches.
STORING // Remove the leaves and store in the fridge for up to one week.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Trim off the leaves and the root, then wash in cool water. Slice as desired.

Silverbeets

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // A good source of dietary fibre, folic acid, and vitamin C. Contains vitamin B6 and riboflavin and is low in sodium.
SELECTING // Select silverbeet with fresh, dark green, crisp leaves and stalks. Avoid leaves that are wilted or scarred.
STORING // Cut off a large section of white stalk, and store stalks and leaves in an airtight plastic bag in the refrigerator crisper.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Trim and remove stalks. Wash leaves and slice. Use in stir-fries, steamed, pureed, combined in quiches, pies or filo parcels.

Spring Onion/Eschallots

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Spring onions are a good source of vitamin C and dietary fibre.
SELECTING // Select eschallots that are medium-sized with fresh looking green leaves that don’t droop too much.
STORING // Refrigerate unwashed, store in a plastic bag or wrap in plastic.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Strip away outside leaves and chop off root.

Squash

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Squash are a good source of vitamin C.
SELECTING // Make sure the squash have a glossy yellow colour and are firm to the touch.
STORING // Squash are best stored in an airtight plastic bag in the refrigerator crisper.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Simply wash and cook whole, sliced or cut into wedges.

Swede

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Swedes are an excellent source of vitamin C and a good source of dietary fibre.
SELECTING // Select well rounded, smooth skinned swedes. Check stem end for deterioration or softness.
STORING // Store swedes in a cool, slightly damp place out of direct sunlight. Unwashed swedes will keep for several months. Avoid putting the 'roots' in the fridge, but the greens will chill for a couple of days.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Wash and peel.

Sweet Potato

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Sweet Potato are an excellent source of vitamin C, a good source of complex carbohydrate, folic acid, vitamin E, potassium and dietary fibre when consumed with the skin on. Orange and yellow varieties are an excellent source of vitamin A.
SELECTING // Choose clean, smooth, well shaped sweet potato.
STORING // Store in a cool, dark, well ventilated place.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Wash and scrub. There is no need to peel.

Sweetcorn

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Corn is an excellent source of dietary fibre and a good source of of potassium.
SELECTING // Buy corn in its husk for freshness and the best flavour. Look for husks that are bright green with white silky threads.
STORING // Store in its husk in the fridge. Corn is best enjoyed within 2 days of purchasing.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Remove the husks and silk just before cooking. To remove the kernels, use a knife to cut down the length of the corn.

Tomatoes

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Tomatoes are high in vitamin C and vitamin A.
SELECTING // Pick tomatoes that are plump and heavy for their size. Also, make sure the tomatoes have a firm, shiny skin with no wrinkles or blemishes.
STORING // Tomatoes store well at room temperature but if you need to store them for longer, you can store them in your fridge.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // If stored in the fridge, bring to room temperature before slicing. Wash and eat all of the tomato except the stem.

Turnips

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Turnips are an excellent source of vitamin C and a good source of dietary fibre.
SELECTING // Select well-rounded, smooth skinned turnips. Check stem end for deterioration or softness.
STORING // Store in a cool, dark, well ventilated place. Can be stored in the refrigerator crisper.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Wash and peel. Small turnips can be used whole, but large ones should be cut into chunks.

Watercress

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Watercress are a good source of vitamin C and A, niacin, thiamine, riboflavin and iron.
SELECTING // Choose fresh looking bunches with green firm leaves and stalks.
STORING // Store for a few days in a plastic bag in the crisper section of the refrigerator. To refresh submerge in cold water for 10 minutes.
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PREPARING // Tear leaves and use in salads and sandwiches. Use as a garnish with meat dishes.

Witlof

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Witlof is high in vitamin C, is a good source of protein, carbohydrates and potassium.
SELECTING // Look for tightly packed leaves with fresh tips.
STORING // Witlof is best stored away from light. Store in a brown paper bag in the crisper for up to two days.
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PREPARING // To reduce the bitterness, cut the harder inner part of the stem off before cooking.

Zucchini

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Zucchini is an excellent source of vitamin C.
SELECTING // Select firm zucchini with glossy skin.
STORING // Store in a sealed plastic bag in the crisper for up to three days.
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PREPARING // Wash and pat dry with a towel. Remove both ends and prepare as desired.

Zucchini Flowers

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Zucchini flowers are a good source of vitamins A, C, E, and K.
SELECTING // Look for firm, fresh looking flowers that are only slightly open.
STORING // Use them the day you buy them.
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PREPARING // Remove stamens, anthers and ovaries before cooking. Many recipes involve stuffing zucchini flowers.

Brussel Sprouts

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Brussels sprouts are packed full of vitamin C. They are also full of vitamin D, folic acid, potassium and vitamin K.
SELECTING // Select brussel sprouts that are firm and slightly springy to the touch
STORING // Brussels sprouts are best kept in the fridge in a perforated plastic bag.
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PREPARING // : A chef's secret is to cut an 'X' in the bottom of the brussel sprout; this helps the core to cook quickly, meaning the entire brussel sprout will be tender and juicy when you eat it.

Cabbage

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Cabbages are packed with vitamin C, dietary fibre and folate.
SELECTING // Look for crisp, brightly coloured cabbages with a subtle sweet smell.
STORING // Store cabbages in a plastic bag in the crisper section of your refrigerator for three to four days.
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PREPARING // Green cabbage has a refreshing flavour and crunchy texture, while red cabbage has thicker leaves and a slightly sweeter taste. They can both be substituted for one another in recipes.