Your Store: LeichhardtWetherill ParkPenrithMerrylandsSt ClairWinston HillsMacarthur (Change)
13 000 TRIMS

Trim's Fruits

Getting the most from your
fresh Fruits

Blackberries

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Blackberries are high in Vitamin C and dietary fibre.
SELECTING // Select deep-coloured blackberries, these will have a more intense flavour. If using blackberries to make jam, you may want to try to find some slightly under-ripe berries, as these contain more pectin, which helps jam to set.
STORING // Blackberries should ideally be used as soon as possible after purchasing. Once home, remove from punnet and transfer to a paper towel-lined plate. Cover with plastic wrap and store in the fridge until ready to eat or cook with.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Blackberries don’t require any preparation. If they have been in the fridge, remove 30 minutes before using as their flavour is best when they are at room temperature.

Currants; Red and White

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Currants are a good source of potassium, manganese, dietary fibre and vitamins C and K.
SELECTING // Select currants that are plump, small and shiny.
STORING // More delicate than other currants, red and white currants don’t store well so should be used as soon as possible. Strip off the stalk just before use.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Currants are quite sour, so mostly used in cooking, jams and sauces although white currants are slightly sweeter.

Figs

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Figs are a good source of dietary fibre, vitamin C, sodium and calcium.
SELECTING // Pick figs with a nice smooth skin. Avoid figs with a sour aroma or sticky appearance.
STORING // Place them in an airtight plastic bag in the fridge but don't store them for more than two to five days or you'll notice a decrease in their taste and texture.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // If storing in the fridge, bring figs to room temperature. Wash figs and gently pat dry. Remove stem. Figs can be eaten raw, skin and all.

Grapefruit

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Grapefruit is an excellent source of vitamins B5 and C and a good source of dietary fibre and potassium.
SELECTING // The best way to judge fruit quality is to hold it: the heavier it is in proportion to its size, the more juice it contains. Small surface bruises or blemishes do not reduce the flavour or quality of the fruit.
STORING // Store in the refrigerator crisper.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Eat the flesh whole (can sprinkle some honey or maple syrup to sweeten them, or add cinnamon and nutmeg), juice them or convert them into a smoothie. Grapefruit can also be a tangy addition to a salad or salsa. 

Limes

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Limes are packed full of vitamin C.
SELECTING // Choose limes that are glossy green with a smooth skin and are nice and heavy. The heaviness is an indication of lots of juice.
STORING // Store limes in the fridge.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Bring limes to room temperature before using to get more juice out of them.

Mangosteens

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Mangosteens are packed with vitamin C and some antioxidants.
SELECTING // Choose mangosteens with a fresh green stem and minimal or no skin imperfections.
STORING // Unopened mangosteens can be kept in the fridge for up to two weeks.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Score around the skin, twist off the top and scoop out the pearly white flesh.

Melons

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Melons are about 90% water so they are great at helping to keep you hydrated. They also contain vitamin C, potassium and fibre.
SELECTING // Pick a heavy melon that shows a clean break from its stem as ripe melons separate easily from their vine.
STORING // If eating within one or two days, store melons at room temperature, otherwise, store in the fridge. If cut open, seal tightly so it doesn't absorb odours.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Slice melon. If melon contains a seed cavity, scoop out seeds. Melons are best eaten at room temperature as the cool dulls their flavour.

Nectarines

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Nectarines are a great source of vitamins A and C.
SELECTING // Choose nectarines that are fragrant, firm, plump and richly coloured with smooth, glossy skin. The fruit should yield slightly when gently pressed.
STORING // To ripen fruit, store it at room temperature out of direct sunlight. Ripe fruit should be stored in the fridge for three to five days.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // The flesh and skin of the nectarine are consumed. Early season varieties have a seed that clings to the flesh, later season varieties separate from the flesh easily. Nectarines taste best consumed at room temperature.

Papaw

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Papaw is an excellent source of vitamin C and a good source of vitamin A and folate.
SELECTING // Look for smooth-skinned pawpaw, with no blemishes or splits in skin.
STORING // Store pawpaw in a single layer at room temperature, out of direct sunlight, until they yield to gently pressure when cradled in your hand. Once at this stage, store in the fridge for 2 to 3 days.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Cut in half lengthways and scoop out seeds then either cut into wedges or peel away the skin before slicing as required.

Passionfruit

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Passionfruit are an excellent source of dietary fibre, vitamin C and vitamin B3.
SELECTING // Purchase passionfruit that are heavy for their size without any soft patches.
STORING // You can store passionfruit at room temperature for up to two weeks or in a plastic bag in the fridge for up to four weeks.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Cut passionfruit in half and spoon out pulp and seeds.

Pears; Paradise

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Pears are full of fibre, vitamin C and folate.
SELECTING // Look for fruit with a clean skin finish.
STORING // Store in the fruit bowl.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Allow ripening in the fruit bowl. To accelerate ripening place in a brown paper bag or next to bananas.

Pears; Williams

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Pears are full of fibre, folate and vitamin C. They are also low GI.
SELECTING // Select pairs that have a yellow-green complexion, firm with no wrinkles.
STORING // Pears can be stored at room temperature for up to four days once ripe or stored in the fridge for up to two weeks.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Skin and flesh are eaten with stem and seeds usually discarded.

Persimmons

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Persimmons are a solid source of vitamin C, vitamin A and dietary fibre.
SELECTING // Look for firm, shiny fruit, with evenly coloured orange skin.
STORING // Ripen persimmons at room temperature then store in the fridge.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Use fresh slices in salads, to accompany pork, lamb or chicken, to make ice-cream, jams, purees and cakes.

Pomelo

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Pomelos are a good source of vitamin C.
SELECTING // Look for pomelo with firm, even-coloured yellow skin.
STORING // Store pomelo at room temperature, out of direct sunlight, for up to one week. Alternatively, store in the fridge for up to 10 days.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Peel away the thick skin and white pith then divide fruit into segments, removing the membrane from each segment. Alternatively, cut fruit in half then squeeze to extract juice.

Prickly Pears

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Prickly pears are a good source of vitamin C and dietary fibre.
SELECTING // Prickly pears are a yellow, orange, or crimson colour if ripe, or a green-purple colour unripe.
STORING // Ripen at room temperature then store in fridge .
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // You can remove the thistles by washing the pear with a stiff brush. Eat them raw (seasoned with lemon or lime), or serve them as a compote or puree.

Rambutans

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Rambutans are a great source of vitamin C and dietary fibre.
SELECTING // Pick rambutans that are an even red or yellow (depending on variety), ensure spines are firm and fruit is free from wrinkles or soft spots.
STORING // Rambutans store best in an air tight container in the fridge.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // To peel rambutans, use a small, sharp knife to cut around the centre of the skin. Gently pull the skin from both ends to remove. Rambutan contain a single seed.

Raspberries

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Raspberries are high in dietary fibre and vitamin C.
SELECTING // Visually check raspberries are bright red, firm, not squished, no visual signs of mould growing and no seeping juices in punnet.
STORING // Berries are very perishable. Store in the fridge for up to two days before consuming. Can be stored in the freezer for up to 12 months.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Allow raspberries to come to room temperature before consuming. Raspberries can be eaten straight from the punnet. Alternatively, they can be washed gently with water first.

Rhubarb

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Rhubarb is a good source of vitamin C, dietary fibre and potassium, a useful source of vitamin B1 and contains some vitamin B3.
SELECTING // When selecting rhubarb, look for glossy, firm, crisp stalks and fresh looking leaves.
STORING // Cover with plastic wrap and store in the refrigerator.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Only eat the stems of rhubarb, don’t eat the leaves – they’re highly poisonous as they contain a toxin known as oxalate, which is poisonous to humans.

Tangelos

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Tangelos are an excellent source of vitamin C, a good source of dietary fibre and contain some vitamin A and folic acid.
SELECTING // Select tangelos with good colour, reasonably firm skins, heavy for their size to indicate good juice content, and free from blemishes.
STORING // Store in the refrigerator crisper for a short time.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Enjoy as a fresh fruit, juice for a refreshing beverage or use segments in salads.

Blackberries

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Blackberries are high in Vitamin C and dietary fibre.
SELECTING // Select deep-coloured blackberries, these will have a more intense flavour. If using blackberries to make jam, you may want to try to find some slightly under-ripe berries, as these contain more pectin, which helps jam to set.
STORING // Blackberries should ideally be used as soon as possible after purchasing. Once home, remove from punnet and transfer to a paper towel-lined plate. Cover with plastic wrap and store in the fridge until ready to eat or cook with.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Blackberries don’t require any preparation. If they have been in the fridge, remove 30 minutes before using as their flavour is best when they are at room temperature.

Figs

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Figs are a good source of dietary fibre, vitamin C, sodium and calcium.
SELECTING // Pick figs with a nice smooth skin. Avoid figs with a sour aroma or sticky appearance.
STORING // Place them in an airtight plastic bag in the fridge but don't store them for more than two to five days or you'll notice a decrease in their taste and texture.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // If storing in the fridge, bring figs to room temperature. Wash figs and gently pat dry. Remove stem. Figs can be eaten raw, skin and all.

Grapefruit

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Grapefruit is an excellent source of vitamins B5 and C and a good source of dietary fibre and potassium.
SELECTING // The best way to judge fruit quality is to hold it: the heavier it is in proportion to its size, the more juice it contains. Small surface bruises or blemishes do not reduce the flavour or quality of the fruit.
STORING // Store in the refrigerator crisper.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Eat the flesh whole (can sprinkle some honey or maple syrup to sweeten them, or add cinnamon and nutmeg), juice them or convert them into a smoothie. Grapefruit can also be a tangy addition to a salad or salsa. 

Lemons

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Lemons are an excellent source of vitamin C, B6 and dietary fibre.
SELECTING // When selecting lemons choose fruit that is glossy, yellow and firm.
STORING // Store at room temperature or in the refrigerator.
AVAILABLE AT // Wetherill Park,Leichhardt,Penrith
PREPARING // Rinse lemons before slicing or zesting. If zest is required, use a fine grater, vegetable peeler or zester to remove the yellow skin (take care to avoid the bitter white pith). If juicing, roll lemons firmly on a bench top first - this helps to relax the cell walls, causing lemons to yield more juice.

Limes

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Limes are packed full of vitamin C.
SELECTING // Choose limes that are glossy green with a smooth skin and are nice and heavy. The heaviness is an indication of lots of juice.
STORING // Store limes in the fridge.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Bring limes to room temperature before using to get more juice out of them.

Mangosteens

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Mangosteens are packed with vitamin C and some antioxidants.
SELECTING // Choose mangosteens with a fresh green stem and minimal or no skin imperfections.
STORING // Unopened mangosteens can be kept in the fridge for up to two weeks.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Score around the skin, twist off the top and scoop out the pearly white flesh.

Melons

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Melons are about 90% water so they are great at helping to keep you hydrated. They also contain vitamin C, potassium and fibre.
SELECTING // Pick a heavy melon that shows a clean break from its stem as ripe melons separate easily from their vine.
STORING // If eating within one or two days, store melons at room temperature, otherwise, store in the fridge. If cut open, seal tightly so it doesn't absorb odours.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Slice melon. If melon contains a seed cavity, scoop out seeds. Melons are best eaten at room temperature as the cool dulls their flavour.

Nectarines

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Nectarines are a great source of vitamins A and C.
SELECTING // Choose nectarines that are fragrant, firm, plump and richly coloured with smooth, glossy skin. The fruit should yield slightly when gently pressed.
STORING // To ripen fruit, store it at room temperature out of direct sunlight. Ripe fruit should be stored in the fridge for three to five days.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // The flesh and skin of the nectarine are consumed. Early season varieties have a seed that clings to the flesh, later season varieties separate from the flesh easily. Nectarines taste best consumed at room temperature.

Papaw

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Papaw is an excellent source of vitamin C and a good source of vitamin A and folate.
SELECTING // Look for smooth-skinned pawpaw, with no blemishes or splits in skin.
STORING // Store pawpaw in a single layer at room temperature, out of direct sunlight, until they yield to gently pressure when cradled in your hand. Once at this stage, store in the fridge for 2 to 3 days.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Cut in half lengthways and scoop out seeds then either cut into wedges or peel away the skin before slicing as required.

Passionfruit

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Passionfruit are an excellent source of dietary fibre, vitamin C and vitamin B3.
SELECTING // Purchase passionfruit that are heavy for their size without any soft patches.
STORING // You can store passionfruit at room temperature for up to two weeks or in a plastic bag in the fridge for up to four weeks.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Cut passionfruit in half and spoon out pulp and seeds.

Pears; Nashi

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Pears are full of fibre, folate and vitamin C. They are also low GI.
SELECTING // Select pairs that are firm with no wrinkles.
STORING // Pears can be stored at room temperature for up to four days once ripe or stored in the fridge for up to two weeks.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Skin and flesh are eaten with stem and seeds usually discarded.

Pears; Paradise

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Pears are full of fibre, vitamin C and folate.
SELECTING // Look for fruit with a clean skin finish.
STORING // Store in the fruit bowl.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Allow ripening in the fruit bowl. To accelerate ripening place in a brown paper bag or next to bananas.

Pears; Williams

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Pears are full of fibre, folate and vitamin C. They are also low GI.
SELECTING // Select pairs that have a yellow-green complexion, firm with no wrinkles.
STORING // Pears can be stored at room temperature for up to four days once ripe or stored in the fridge for up to two weeks.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Skin and flesh are eaten with stem and seeds usually discarded.

Persimmons

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Persimmons are a solid source of vitamin C, vitamin A and dietary fibre.
SELECTING // Look for firm, shiny fruit, with evenly coloured orange skin.
STORING // Ripen persimmons at room temperature then store in the fridge.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Use fresh slices in salads, to accompany pork, lamb or chicken, to make ice-cream, jams, purees and cakes.

Prickly Pears

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Prickly pears are a good source of vitamin C and dietary fibre.
SELECTING // Prickly pears are a yellow, orange, or crimson colour if ripe, or a green-purple colour unripe.
STORING // Ripen at room temperature then store in fridge .
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // You can remove the thistles by washing the pear with a stiff brush. Eat them raw (seasoned with lemon or lime), or serve them as a compote or puree.

Rambutans

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Rambutans are a great source of vitamin C and dietary fibre.
SELECTING // Pick rambutans that are an even red or yellow (depending on variety), ensure spines are firm and fruit is free from wrinkles or soft spots.
STORING // Rambutans store best in an air tight container in the fridge.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // To peel rambutans, use a small, sharp knife to cut around the centre of the skin. Gently pull the skin from both ends to remove. Rambutan contain a single seed.

Raspberries

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Raspberries are high in dietary fibre and vitamin C.
SELECTING // Visually check raspberries are bright red, firm, not squished, no visual signs of mould growing and no seeping juices in punnet.
STORING // Berries are very perishable. Store in the fridge for up to two days before consuming. Can be stored in the freezer for up to 12 months.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Allow raspberries to come to room temperature before consuming. Raspberries can be eaten straight from the punnet. Alternatively, they can be washed gently with water first.

Rhubarb

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Rhubarb is a good source of vitamin C, dietary fibre and potassium, a useful source of vitamin B1 and contains some vitamin B3.
SELECTING // When selecting rhubarb, look for glossy, firm, crisp stalks and fresh looking leaves.
STORING // Cover with plastic wrap and store in the refrigerator.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Only eat the stems of rhubarb, don’t eat the leaves – they’re highly poisonous as they contain a toxin known as oxalate, which is poisonous to humans.

Tangelos

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Tangelos are an excellent source of vitamin C, a good source of dietary fibre and contain some vitamin A and folic acid.
SELECTING // Select tangelos with good colour, reasonably firm skins, heavy for their size to indicate good juice content, and free from blemishes.
STORING // Store in the refrigerator crisper for a short time.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Enjoy as a fresh fruit, juice for a refreshing beverage or use segments in salads.

Blackberries

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Blackberries are high in Vitamin C and dietary fibre.
SELECTING // Select deep-coloured blackberries, these will have a more intense flavour. If using blackberries to make jam, you may want to try to find some slightly under-ripe berries, as these contain more pectin, which helps jam to set.
STORING // Blackberries should ideally be used as soon as possible after purchasing. Once home, remove from punnet and transfer to a paper towel-lined plate. Cover with plastic wrap and store in the fridge until ready to eat or cook with.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Blackberries don’t require any preparation. If they have been in the fridge, remove 30 minutes before using as their flavour is best when they are at room temperature.

Custard Apples

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Custard apples are a good source of dietary fibre and vitamin C. They are also a handy source of vitamin B2, vitamin B6, magnesium, potassium and complex carbohydrates.
SELECTING // Select evenly coloured fruit, which can also have brown tinged ridges.
STORING // Custard apples ripen best at room temperature. For longer storage, they keep in the fridge.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Custard apples can only be eaten when fully ripe. Cut and scoop out the flesh for consumption.

Figs

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Figs are a good source of dietary fibre, vitamin C, sodium and calcium.
SELECTING // Pick figs with a nice smooth skin. Avoid figs with a sour aroma or sticky appearance.
STORING // Place them in an airtight plastic bag in the fridge but don't store them for more than two to five days or you'll notice a decrease in their taste and texture.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // If storing in the fridge, bring figs to room temperature. Wash figs and gently pat dry. Remove stem. Figs can be eaten raw, skin and all.

Grapefruit

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Grapefruit is an excellent source of vitamins B5 and C and a good source of dietary fibre and potassium.
SELECTING // The best way to judge fruit quality is to hold it: the heavier it is in proportion to its size, the more juice it contains. Small surface bruises or blemishes do not reduce the flavour or quality of the fruit.
STORING // Store in the refrigerator crisper.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Eat the flesh whole (can sprinkle some honey or maple syrup to sweeten them, or add cinnamon and nutmeg), juice them or convert them into a smoothie. Grapefruit can also be a tangy addition to a salad or salsa. 

Guava

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Guava are very high in vitamin C, particularly the skin.
SELECTING // Select fruits free from blemishes.
STORING // Keep at room temperature until ripe, then use or store in the refrigerator for a few days.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Skin, flesh and seeds are all edible.

Lemons

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Lemons are an excellent source of vitamin C, B6 and dietary fibre.
SELECTING // When selecting lemons choose fruit that is glossy, yellow and firm.
STORING // Store at room temperature or in the refrigerator.
AVAILABLE AT // Wetherill Park,Leichhardt,Penrith
PREPARING // Rinse lemons before slicing or zesting. If zest is required, use a fine grater, vegetable peeler or zester to remove the yellow skin (take care to avoid the bitter white pith). If juicing, roll lemons firmly on a bench top first - this helps to relax the cell walls, causing lemons to yield more juice.

Limes

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Limes are packed full of vitamin C.
SELECTING // Choose limes that are glossy green with a smooth skin and are nice and heavy. The heaviness is an indication of lots of juice.
STORING // Store limes in the fridge.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Bring limes to room temperature before using to get more juice out of them.

Mandarins

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Mandarins are a fantastic source of vitamin C and are also a solid source of folate and fibre. The imperial mandarin is also a good source of vitamin A.
SELECTING // Look for mandarins that are heavy for their size with a glossy skin free of cuts, blemishes, soft spots or mold.
STORING // Mandarins can be kept in a dark, cool place for up to a week, or in the crisper section of the fridge for up to two weeks.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Mandarins can be peeled and juiced, or segmented and eaten like oranges. Seeds should be removed if using in cooking.

Mangosteens

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Mangosteens are packed with vitamin C and some antioxidants.
SELECTING // Choose mangosteens with a fresh green stem and minimal or no skin imperfections.
STORING // Unopened mangosteens can be kept in the fridge for up to two weeks.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Score around the skin, twist off the top and scoop out the pearly white flesh.

Melons

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Melons are about 90% water so they are great at helping to keep you hydrated. They also contain vitamin C, potassium and fibre.
SELECTING // Pick a heavy melon that shows a clean break from its stem as ripe melons separate easily from their vine.
STORING // If eating within one or two days, store melons at room temperature, otherwise, store in the fridge. If cut open, seal tightly so it doesn't absorb odours.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Slice melon. If melon contains a seed cavity, scoop out seeds. Melons are best eaten at room temperature as the cool dulls their flavour.

Nectarines

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Nectarines are a great source of vitamins A and C.
SELECTING // Choose nectarines that are fragrant, firm, plump and richly coloured with smooth, glossy skin. The fruit should yield slightly when gently pressed.
STORING // To ripen fruit, store it at room temperature out of direct sunlight. Ripe fruit should be stored in the fridge for three to five days.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // The flesh and skin of the nectarine are consumed. Early season varieties have a seed that clings to the flesh, later season varieties separate from the flesh easily. Nectarines taste best consumed at room temperature.

Papaw

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Papaw is an excellent source of vitamin C and a good source of vitamin A and folate.
SELECTING // Look for smooth-skinned pawpaw, with no blemishes or splits in skin.
STORING // Store pawpaw in a single layer at room temperature, out of direct sunlight, until they yield to gently pressure when cradled in your hand. Once at this stage, store in the fridge for 2 to 3 days.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Cut in half lengthways and scoop out seeds then either cut into wedges or peel away the skin before slicing as required.

Passionfruit

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Passionfruit are an excellent source of dietary fibre, vitamin C and vitamin B3.
SELECTING // Purchase passionfruit that are heavy for their size without any soft patches.
STORING // You can store passionfruit at room temperature for up to two weeks or in a plastic bag in the fridge for up to four weeks.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Cut passionfruit in half and spoon out pulp and seeds.

Pears; Nashi

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Pears are full of fibre, folate and vitamin C. They are also low GI.
SELECTING // Select pairs that are firm with no wrinkles.
STORING // Pears can be stored at room temperature for up to four days once ripe or stored in the fridge for up to two weeks.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Skin and flesh are eaten with stem and seeds usually discarded.

Pears; Williams

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Pears are full of fibre, folate and vitamin C. They are also low GI.
SELECTING // Select pairs that have a yellow-green complexion, firm with no wrinkles.
STORING // Pears can be stored at room temperature for up to four days once ripe or stored in the fridge for up to two weeks.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Skin and flesh are eaten with stem and seeds usually discarded.

Persimmons

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Persimmons are a solid source of vitamin C, vitamin A and dietary fibre.
SELECTING // Look for firm, shiny fruit, with evenly coloured orange skin.
STORING // Ripen persimmons at room temperature then store in the fridge.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Use fresh slices in salads, to accompany pork, lamb or chicken, to make ice-cream, jams, purees and cakes.

Pomegranates

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Pomegranates are a good source of dietary fibre and vitamin C, pomegranates also contain a range of valuable anti-oxidants.
SELECTING // Skin should be uniform in colour. Avoid fruit with cracks in the rind or heavy bruising although slight blemishes in the leathery skin are acceptable.
STORING // Pomegranates keep for up to a month in the fridge or fruit bowl.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // The only edible part of a pomegranate is its seeds.

Prickly Pears

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Prickly pears are a good source of vitamin C and dietary fibre.
SELECTING // Prickly pears are a yellow, orange, or crimson colour if ripe, or a green-purple colour unripe.
STORING // Ripen at room temperature then store in fridge .
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // You can remove the thistles by washing the pear with a stiff brush. Eat them raw (seasoned with lemon or lime), or serve them as a compote or puree.

Quince

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Quinces are high in vitamin C, vitamin E, fibre and potassium.
SELECTING // Select quince with a predominantly yellow colour with a slight green tinge that are plump and hard with no signs of ageing.
STORING // Store at room temperature to ripen then transfer to the fridge.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Quinces can't be eaten raw; a long cooking time brings out its best - this transforms it into a ruby-red colour, with a slightly grainy texture similar to pear.

Rambutans

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Rambutans are a great source of vitamin C and dietary fibre.
SELECTING // Pick rambutans that are an even red or yellow (depending on variety), ensure spines are firm and fruit is free from wrinkles or soft spots.
STORING // Rambutans store best in an air tight container in the fridge.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // To peel rambutans, use a small, sharp knife to cut around the centre of the skin. Gently pull the skin from both ends to remove. Rambutan contain a single seed.

Raspberries

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Raspberries are high in dietary fibre and vitamin C.
SELECTING // Visually check raspberries are bright red, firm, not squished, no visual signs of mould growing and no seeping juices in punnet.
STORING // Berries are very perishable. Store in the fridge for up to two days before consuming. Can be stored in the freezer for up to 12 months.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Allow raspberries to come to room temperature before consuming. Raspberries can be eaten straight from the punnet. Alternatively, they can be washed gently with water first.

Rhubarb

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Rhubarb is a good source of vitamin C, dietary fibre and potassium, a useful source of vitamin B1 and contains some vitamin B3.
SELECTING // When selecting rhubarb, look for glossy, firm, crisp stalks and fresh looking leaves.
STORING // Cover with plastic wrap and store in the refrigerator.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Only eat the stems of rhubarb, don’t eat the leaves – they’re highly poisonous as they contain a toxin known as oxalate, which is poisonous to humans.

Tamarillo

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Tamarillo’s are a good source of vitamin C, dietary fibre and potassium.
SELECTING // Select tamarillos with smooth, glossy skin. They should be firm with no wrinkled patches.
STORING // Store tamarillos at room temperature until they are still firm but just yield to the touch. Once at this stage, store in the fridge for up to 10 days.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Skin is inedible so discard and eat flesh.

Tangelos

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Tangelos are an excellent source of vitamin C, a good source of dietary fibre and contain some vitamin A and folic acid.
SELECTING // Select tangelos with good colour, reasonably firm skins, heavy for their size to indicate good juice content, and free from blemishes.
STORING // Store in the refrigerator crisper for a short time.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Enjoy as a fresh fruit, juice for a refreshing beverage or use segments in salads.

Custard Apples

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Custard apples are a good source of dietary fibre and vitamin C. They are also a handy source of vitamin B2, vitamin B6, magnesium, potassium and complex carbohydrates.
SELECTING // Select evenly coloured fruit, which can also have brown tinged ridges.
STORING // Custard apples ripen best at room temperature. For longer storage, they keep in the fridge.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Custard apples can only be eaten when fully ripe. Cut and scoop out the flesh for consumption.

Grapefruit

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Grapefruit is an excellent source of vitamins B5 and C and a good source of dietary fibre and potassium.
SELECTING // The best way to judge fruit quality is to hold it: the heavier it is in proportion to its size, the more juice it contains. Small surface bruises or blemishes do not reduce the flavour or quality of the fruit.
STORING // Store in the refrigerator crisper.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Eat the flesh whole (can sprinkle some honey or maple syrup to sweeten them, or add cinnamon and nutmeg), juice them or convert them into a smoothie. Grapefruit can also be a tangy addition to a salad or salsa. 

Guava

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Guava are very high in vitamin C, particularly the skin.
SELECTING // Select fruits free from blemishes.
STORING // Keep at room temperature until ripe, then use or store in the refrigerator for a few days.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Skin, flesh and seeds are all edible.

Lemons

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Lemons are an excellent source of vitamin C, B6 and dietary fibre.
SELECTING // When selecting lemons choose fruit that is glossy, yellow and firm.
STORING // Store at room temperature or in the refrigerator.
AVAILABLE AT // Wetherill Park,Leichhardt,Penrith
PREPARING // Rinse lemons before slicing or zesting. If zest is required, use a fine grater, vegetable peeler or zester to remove the yellow skin (take care to avoid the bitter white pith). If juicing, roll lemons firmly on a bench top first - this helps to relax the cell walls, causing lemons to yield more juice.

Limes

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Limes are packed full of vitamin C.
SELECTING // Choose limes that are glossy green with a smooth skin and are nice and heavy. The heaviness is an indication of lots of juice.
STORING // Store limes in the fridge.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Bring limes to room temperature before using to get more juice out of them.

Mandarins

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Mandarins are a fantastic source of vitamin C and are also a solid source of folate and fibre. The imperial mandarin is also a good source of vitamin A.
SELECTING // Look for mandarins that are heavy for their size with a glossy skin free of cuts, blemishes, soft spots or mold.
STORING // Mandarins can be kept in a dark, cool place for up to a week, or in the crisper section of the fridge for up to two weeks.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Mandarins can be peeled and juiced, or segmented and eaten like oranges. Seeds should be removed if using in cooking.

Mangosteens

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Mangosteens are packed with vitamin C and some antioxidants.
SELECTING // Choose mangosteens with a fresh green stem and minimal or no skin imperfections.
STORING // Unopened mangosteens can be kept in the fridge for up to two weeks.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Score around the skin, twist off the top and scoop out the pearly white flesh.

Melons

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Melons are about 90% water so they are great at helping to keep you hydrated. They also contain vitamin C, potassium and fibre.
SELECTING // Pick a heavy melon that shows a clean break from its stem as ripe melons separate easily from their vine.
STORING // If eating within one or two days, store melons at room temperature, otherwise, store in the fridge. If cut open, seal tightly so it doesn't absorb odours.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Slice melon. If melon contains a seed cavity, scoop out seeds. Melons are best eaten at room temperature as the cool dulls their flavour.

Nectarines

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Nectarines are a great source of vitamins A and C.
SELECTING // Choose nectarines that are fragrant, firm, plump and richly coloured with smooth, glossy skin. The fruit should yield slightly when gently pressed.
STORING // To ripen fruit, store it at room temperature out of direct sunlight. Ripe fruit should be stored in the fridge for three to five days.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // The flesh and skin of the nectarine are consumed. Early season varieties have a seed that clings to the flesh, later season varieties separate from the flesh easily. Nectarines taste best consumed at room temperature.

Papaw

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Papaw is an excellent source of vitamin C and a good source of vitamin A and folate.
SELECTING // Look for smooth-skinned pawpaw, with no blemishes or splits in skin.
STORING // Store pawpaw in a single layer at room temperature, out of direct sunlight, until they yield to gently pressure when cradled in your hand. Once at this stage, store in the fridge for 2 to 3 days.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Cut in half lengthways and scoop out seeds then either cut into wedges or peel away the skin before slicing as required.

Passionfruit

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Passionfruit are an excellent source of dietary fibre, vitamin C and vitamin B3.
SELECTING // Purchase passionfruit that are heavy for their size without any soft patches.
STORING // You can store passionfruit at room temperature for up to two weeks or in a plastic bag in the fridge for up to four weeks.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Cut passionfruit in half and spoon out pulp and seeds.

Pears; Nashi

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Pears are full of fibre, folate and vitamin C. They are also low GI.
SELECTING // Select pairs that are firm with no wrinkles.
STORING // Pears can be stored at room temperature for up to four days once ripe or stored in the fridge for up to two weeks.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Skin and flesh are eaten with stem and seeds usually discarded.

Pears; Williams

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Pears are full of fibre, folate and vitamin C. They are also low GI.
SELECTING // Select pairs that have a yellow-green complexion, firm with no wrinkles.
STORING // Pears can be stored at room temperature for up to four days once ripe or stored in the fridge for up to two weeks.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Skin and flesh are eaten with stem and seeds usually discarded.

Persimmons

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Persimmons are a solid source of vitamin C, vitamin A and dietary fibre.
SELECTING // Look for firm, shiny fruit, with evenly coloured orange skin.
STORING // Ripen persimmons at room temperature then store in the fridge.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Use fresh slices in salads, to accompany pork, lamb or chicken, to make ice-cream, jams, purees and cakes.

Pomegranates

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Pomegranates are a good source of dietary fibre and vitamin C, pomegranates also contain a range of valuable anti-oxidants.
SELECTING // Skin should be uniform in colour. Avoid fruit with cracks in the rind or heavy bruising although slight blemishes in the leathery skin are acceptable.
STORING // Pomegranates keep for up to a month in the fridge or fruit bowl.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // The only edible part of a pomegranate is its seeds.

Quince

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Quinces are high in vitamin C, vitamin E, fibre and potassium.
SELECTING // Select quince with a predominantly yellow colour with a slight green tinge that are plump and hard with no signs of ageing.
STORING // Store at room temperature to ripen then transfer to the fridge.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Quinces can't be eaten raw; a long cooking time brings out its best - this transforms it into a ruby-red colour, with a slightly grainy texture similar to pear.

Rambutans

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Rambutans are a great source of vitamin C and dietary fibre.
SELECTING // Pick rambutans that are an even red or yellow (depending on variety), ensure spines are firm and fruit is free from wrinkles or soft spots.
STORING // Rambutans store best in an air tight container in the fridge.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // To peel rambutans, use a small, sharp knife to cut around the centre of the skin. Gently pull the skin from both ends to remove. Rambutan contain a single seed.

Rhubarb

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Rhubarb is a good source of vitamin C, dietary fibre and potassium, a useful source of vitamin B1 and contains some vitamin B3.
SELECTING // When selecting rhubarb, look for glossy, firm, crisp stalks and fresh looking leaves.
STORING // Cover with plastic wrap and store in the refrigerator.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Only eat the stems of rhubarb, don’t eat the leaves – they’re highly poisonous as they contain a toxin known as oxalate, which is poisonous to humans.

Tamarillo

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Tamarillo’s are a good source of vitamin C, dietary fibre and potassium.
SELECTING // Select tamarillos with smooth, glossy skin. They should be firm with no wrinkled patches.
STORING // Store tamarillos at room temperature until they are still firm but just yield to the touch. Once at this stage, store in the fridge for up to 10 days.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Skin is inedible so discard and eat flesh.

Custard Apples

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Custard apples are a good source of dietary fibre and vitamin C. They are also a handy source of vitamin B2, vitamin B6, magnesium, potassium and complex carbohydrates.
SELECTING // Select evenly coloured fruit, which can also have brown tinged ridges.
STORING // Custard apples ripen best at room temperature. For longer storage, they keep in the fridge.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Custard apples can only be eaten when fully ripe. Cut and scoop out the flesh for consumption.

Grapefruit

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Grapefruit is an excellent source of vitamins B5 and C and a good source of dietary fibre and potassium.
SELECTING // The best way to judge fruit quality is to hold it: the heavier it is in proportion to its size, the more juice it contains. Small surface bruises or blemishes do not reduce the flavour or quality of the fruit.
STORING // Store in the refrigerator crisper.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Eat the flesh whole (can sprinkle some honey or maple syrup to sweeten them, or add cinnamon and nutmeg), juice them or convert them into a smoothie. Grapefruit can also be a tangy addition to a salad or salsa. 

Guava

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Guava are very high in vitamin C, particularly the skin.
SELECTING // Select fruits free from blemishes.
STORING // Keep at room temperature until ripe, then use or store in the refrigerator for a few days.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Skin, flesh and seeds are all edible.

Lemons

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Lemons are an excellent source of vitamin C, B6 and dietary fibre.
SELECTING // When selecting lemons choose fruit that is glossy, yellow and firm.
STORING // Store at room temperature or in the refrigerator.
AVAILABLE AT // Wetherill Park,Leichhardt,Penrith
PREPARING // Rinse lemons before slicing or zesting. If zest is required, use a fine grater, vegetable peeler or zester to remove the yellow skin (take care to avoid the bitter white pith). If juicing, roll lemons firmly on a bench top first - this helps to relax the cell walls, causing lemons to yield more juice.

Limes

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Limes are packed full of vitamin C.
SELECTING // Choose limes that are glossy green with a smooth skin and are nice and heavy. The heaviness is an indication of lots of juice.
STORING // Store limes in the fridge.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Bring limes to room temperature before using to get more juice out of them.

Mandarins

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Mandarins are a fantastic source of vitamin C and are also a solid source of folate and fibre. The imperial mandarin is also a good source of vitamin A.
SELECTING // Look for mandarins that are heavy for their size with a glossy skin free of cuts, blemishes, soft spots or mold.
STORING // Mandarins can be kept in a dark, cool place for up to a week, or in the crisper section of the fridge for up to two weeks.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Mandarins can be peeled and juiced, or segmented and eaten like oranges. Seeds should be removed if using in cooking.

Melons

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Melons are about 90% water so they are great at helping to keep you hydrated. They also contain vitamin C, potassium and fibre.
SELECTING // Pick a heavy melon that shows a clean break from its stem as ripe melons separate easily from their vine.
STORING // If eating within one or two days, store melons at room temperature, otherwise, store in the fridge. If cut open, seal tightly so it doesn't absorb odours.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Slice melon. If melon contains a seed cavity, scoop out seeds. Melons are best eaten at room temperature as the cool dulls their flavour.

Oranges; Navel

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Oranges are a fantastic source of vitamin C. Navel oranges also a good source of folate and fibre.
SELECTING // When selecting, make sure the navel orange is firm and glossy.
STORING // Oranges store longest in the fridge.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Navels are the best oranges for eating and also combine well with duck, pork, chicken and ham.

Papaw

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Papaw is an excellent source of vitamin C and a good source of vitamin A and folate.
SELECTING // Look for smooth-skinned pawpaw, with no blemishes or splits in skin.
STORING // Store pawpaw in a single layer at room temperature, out of direct sunlight, until they yield to gently pressure when cradled in your hand. Once at this stage, store in the fridge for 2 to 3 days.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Cut in half lengthways and scoop out seeds then either cut into wedges or peel away the skin before slicing as required.

Passionfruit

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Passionfruit are an excellent source of dietary fibre, vitamin C and vitamin B3.
SELECTING // Purchase passionfruit that are heavy for their size without any soft patches.
STORING // You can store passionfruit at room temperature for up to two weeks or in a plastic bag in the fridge for up to four weeks.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Cut passionfruit in half and spoon out pulp and seeds.

Pears; Nashi

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Pears are full of fibre, folate and vitamin C. They are also low GI.
SELECTING // Select pairs that are firm with no wrinkles.
STORING // Pears can be stored at room temperature for up to four days once ripe or stored in the fridge for up to two weeks.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Skin and flesh are eaten with stem and seeds usually discarded.

Pears; Williams

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Pears are full of fibre, folate and vitamin C. They are also low GI.
SELECTING // Select pairs that have a yellow-green complexion, firm with no wrinkles.
STORING // Pears can be stored at room temperature for up to four days once ripe or stored in the fridge for up to two weeks.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Skin and flesh are eaten with stem and seeds usually discarded.

Persimmons

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Persimmons are a solid source of vitamin C, vitamin A and dietary fibre.
SELECTING // Look for firm, shiny fruit, with evenly coloured orange skin.
STORING // Ripen persimmons at room temperature then store in the fridge.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Use fresh slices in salads, to accompany pork, lamb or chicken, to make ice-cream, jams, purees and cakes.

Pomegranates

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Pomegranates are a good source of dietary fibre and vitamin C, pomegranates also contain a range of valuable anti-oxidants.
SELECTING // Skin should be uniform in colour. Avoid fruit with cracks in the rind or heavy bruising although slight blemishes in the leathery skin are acceptable.
STORING // Pomegranates keep for up to a month in the fridge or fruit bowl.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // The only edible part of a pomegranate is its seeds.

Quince

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Quinces are high in vitamin C, vitamin E, fibre and potassium.
SELECTING // Select quince with a predominantly yellow colour with a slight green tinge that are plump and hard with no signs of ageing.
STORING // Store at room temperature to ripen then transfer to the fridge.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Quinces can't be eaten raw; a long cooking time brings out its best - this transforms it into a ruby-red colour, with a slightly grainy texture similar to pear.

Rambutans

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Rambutans are a great source of vitamin C and dietary fibre.
SELECTING // Pick rambutans that are an even red or yellow (depending on variety), ensure spines are firm and fruit is free from wrinkles or soft spots.
STORING // Rambutans store best in an air tight container in the fridge.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // To peel rambutans, use a small, sharp knife to cut around the centre of the skin. Gently pull the skin from both ends to remove. Rambutan contain a single seed.

Raspberries

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Raspberries are high in dietary fibre and vitamin C.
SELECTING // Visually check raspberries are bright red, firm, not squished, no visual signs of mould growing and no seeping juices in punnet.
STORING // Berries are very perishable. Store in the fridge for up to two days before consuming. Can be stored in the freezer for up to 12 months.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Allow raspberries to come to room temperature before consuming. Raspberries can be eaten straight from the punnet. Alternatively, they can be washed gently with water first.

Rhubarb

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Rhubarb is a good source of vitamin C, dietary fibre and potassium, a useful source of vitamin B1 and contains some vitamin B3.
SELECTING // When selecting rhubarb, look for glossy, firm, crisp stalks and fresh looking leaves.
STORING // Cover with plastic wrap and store in the refrigerator.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Only eat the stems of rhubarb, don’t eat the leaves – they’re highly poisonous as they contain a toxin known as oxalate, which is poisonous to humans.

Tamarillo

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Tamarillo’s are a good source of vitamin C, dietary fibre and potassium.
SELECTING // Select tamarillos with smooth, glossy skin. They should be firm with no wrinkled patches.
STORING // Store tamarillos at room temperature until they are still firm but just yield to the touch. Once at this stage, store in the fridge for up to 10 days.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Skin is inedible so discard and eat flesh.

Tangelos

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Tangelos are an excellent source of vitamin C, a good source of dietary fibre and contain some vitamin A and folic acid.
SELECTING // Select tangelos with good colour, reasonably firm skins, heavy for their size to indicate good juice content, and free from blemishes.
STORING // Store in the refrigerator crisper for a short time.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Enjoy as a fresh fruit, juice for a refreshing beverage or use segments in salads.

Custard Apples

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Custard apples are a good source of dietary fibre and vitamin C. They are also a handy source of vitamin B2, vitamin B6, magnesium, potassium and complex carbohydrates.
SELECTING // Select evenly coloured fruit, which can also have brown tinged ridges.
STORING // Custard apples ripen best at room temperature. For longer storage, they keep in the fridge.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Custard apples can only be eaten when fully ripe. Cut and scoop out the flesh for consumption.

Grapefruit

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Grapefruit is an excellent source of vitamins B5 and C and a good source of dietary fibre and potassium.
SELECTING // The best way to judge fruit quality is to hold it: the heavier it is in proportion to its size, the more juice it contains. Small surface bruises or blemishes do not reduce the flavour or quality of the fruit.
STORING // Store in the refrigerator crisper.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Eat the flesh whole (can sprinkle some honey or maple syrup to sweeten them, or add cinnamon and nutmeg), juice them or convert them into a smoothie. Grapefruit can also be a tangy addition to a salad or salsa. 

Lemons

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Lemons are an excellent source of vitamin C, B6 and dietary fibre.
SELECTING // When selecting lemons choose fruit that is glossy, yellow and firm.
STORING // Store at room temperature or in the refrigerator.
AVAILABLE AT // Wetherill Park,Leichhardt,Penrith
PREPARING // Rinse lemons before slicing or zesting. If zest is required, use a fine grater, vegetable peeler or zester to remove the yellow skin (take care to avoid the bitter white pith). If juicing, roll lemons firmly on a bench top first - this helps to relax the cell walls, causing lemons to yield more juice.

Mandarins

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Mandarins are a fantastic source of vitamin C and are also a solid source of folate and fibre. The imperial mandarin is also a good source of vitamin A.
SELECTING // Look for mandarins that are heavy for their size with a glossy skin free of cuts, blemishes, soft spots or mold.
STORING // Mandarins can be kept in a dark, cool place for up to a week, or in the crisper section of the fridge for up to two weeks.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Mandarins can be peeled and juiced, or segmented and eaten like oranges. Seeds should be removed if using in cooking.

Mandarins; Honey Murcott

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Mandarins are a fantastic source of vitamin C and are also a solid source of folate and fibre.
SELECTING // Select mandarins that are heavy for their size with a glossy skin free of cuts, blemishes, soft spots or mold.
STORING // Mandarins can be kept in a dark, cool place for up to a week, or in the crisper section of the fridge for up to two weeks.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Mandarins can be peeled and juiced, or segmented and eaten like oranges. Seeds should be removed if using in cooking.

Melons

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Melons are about 90% water so they are great at helping to keep you hydrated. They also contain vitamin C, potassium and fibre.
SELECTING // Pick a heavy melon that shows a clean break from its stem as ripe melons separate easily from their vine.
STORING // If eating within one or two days, store melons at room temperature, otherwise, store in the fridge. If cut open, seal tightly so it doesn't absorb odours.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Slice melon. If melon contains a seed cavity, scoop out seeds. Melons are best eaten at room temperature as the cool dulls their flavour.

Oranges; Navel

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Oranges are a fantastic source of vitamin C. Navel oranges also a good source of folate and fibre.
SELECTING // When selecting, make sure the navel orange is firm and glossy.
STORING // Oranges store longest in the fridge.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Navels are the best oranges for eating and also combine well with duck, pork, chicken and ham.

Oranges; Seville

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Oranges are a great source of vitamin C. They are also a good source of folate and fibre.
SELECTING // Select fruit that is firm, unblemished, and feels heavy for its size.
STORING // Store oranges at room temperature or in the fridge for up to two weeks.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Seville oranges are fantastic for making your own homemade marmalade.

Papaw

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Papaw is an excellent source of vitamin C and a good source of vitamin A and folate.
SELECTING // Look for smooth-skinned pawpaw, with no blemishes or splits in skin.
STORING // Store pawpaw in a single layer at room temperature, out of direct sunlight, until they yield to gently pressure when cradled in your hand. Once at this stage, store in the fridge for 2 to 3 days.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Cut in half lengthways and scoop out seeds then either cut into wedges or peel away the skin before slicing as required.

Passionfruit

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Passionfruit are an excellent source of dietary fibre, vitamin C and vitamin B3.
SELECTING // Purchase passionfruit that are heavy for their size without any soft patches.
STORING // You can store passionfruit at room temperature for up to two weeks or in a plastic bag in the fridge for up to four weeks.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Cut passionfruit in half and spoon out pulp and seeds.

Pears; Nashi

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Pears are full of fibre, folate and vitamin C. They are also low GI.
SELECTING // Select pairs that are firm with no wrinkles.
STORING // Pears can be stored at room temperature for up to four days once ripe or stored in the fridge for up to two weeks.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Skin and flesh are eaten with stem and seeds usually discarded.

Persimmons

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Persimmons are a solid source of vitamin C, vitamin A and dietary fibre.
SELECTING // Look for firm, shiny fruit, with evenly coloured orange skin.
STORING // Ripen persimmons at room temperature then store in the fridge.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Use fresh slices in salads, to accompany pork, lamb or chicken, to make ice-cream, jams, purees and cakes.

Pomegranates

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Pomegranates are a good source of dietary fibre and vitamin C, pomegranates also contain a range of valuable anti-oxidants.
SELECTING // Skin should be uniform in colour. Avoid fruit with cracks in the rind or heavy bruising although slight blemishes in the leathery skin are acceptable.
STORING // Pomegranates keep for up to a month in the fridge or fruit bowl.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // The only edible part of a pomegranate is its seeds.

Rambutans

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Rambutans are a great source of vitamin C and dietary fibre.
SELECTING // Pick rambutans that are an even red or yellow (depending on variety), ensure spines are firm and fruit is free from wrinkles or soft spots.
STORING // Rambutans store best in an air tight container in the fridge.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // To peel rambutans, use a small, sharp knife to cut around the centre of the skin. Gently pull the skin from both ends to remove. Rambutan contain a single seed.

Raspberries

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Raspberries are high in dietary fibre and vitamin C.
SELECTING // Visually check raspberries are bright red, firm, not squished, no visual signs of mould growing and no seeping juices in punnet.
STORING // Berries are very perishable. Store in the fridge for up to two days before consuming. Can be stored in the freezer for up to 12 months.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Allow raspberries to come to room temperature before consuming. Raspberries can be eaten straight from the punnet. Alternatively, they can be washed gently with water first.

Rhubarb

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Rhubarb is a good source of vitamin C, dietary fibre and potassium, a useful source of vitamin B1 and contains some vitamin B3.
SELECTING // When selecting rhubarb, look for glossy, firm, crisp stalks and fresh looking leaves.
STORING // Cover with plastic wrap and store in the refrigerator.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Only eat the stems of rhubarb, don’t eat the leaves – they’re highly poisonous as they contain a toxin known as oxalate, which is poisonous to humans.

Tamarillo

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Tamarillo’s are a good source of vitamin C, dietary fibre and potassium.
SELECTING // Select tamarillos with smooth, glossy skin. They should be firm with no wrinkled patches.
STORING // Store tamarillos at room temperature until they are still firm but just yield to the touch. Once at this stage, store in the fridge for up to 10 days.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Skin is inedible so discard and eat flesh.

Tangelos

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Tangelos are an excellent source of vitamin C, a good source of dietary fibre and contain some vitamin A and folic acid.
SELECTING // Select tangelos with good colour, reasonably firm skins, heavy for their size to indicate good juice content, and free from blemishes.
STORING // Store in the refrigerator crisper for a short time.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Enjoy as a fresh fruit, juice for a refreshing beverage or use segments in salads.

Cumquat

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Cumquats are an excellent source of vitamin C and a good source of dietary fibre.
SELECTING // Select rich orange, glossy fruit with no soft spots or signs of deterioration.
STORING // Ripen at room temperature and store in the refrigerator crisper for a short time.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Preserves in sugar syrup, brandy or in marmalades. Serve with pork and chicken dishes. The rind can be used for recipes containing citrus peel.

Custard Apples

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Custard apples are a good source of dietary fibre and vitamin C. They are also a handy source of vitamin B2, vitamin B6, magnesium, potassium and complex carbohydrates.
SELECTING // Select evenly coloured fruit, which can also have brown tinged ridges.
STORING // Custard apples ripen best at room temperature. For longer storage, they keep in the fridge.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Custard apples can only be eaten when fully ripe. Cut and scoop out the flesh for consumption.

Grapefruit

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Grapefruit is an excellent source of vitamins B5 and C and a good source of dietary fibre and potassium.
SELECTING // The best way to judge fruit quality is to hold it: the heavier it is in proportion to its size, the more juice it contains. Small surface bruises or blemishes do not reduce the flavour or quality of the fruit.
STORING // Store in the refrigerator crisper.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Eat the flesh whole (can sprinkle some honey or maple syrup to sweeten them, or add cinnamon and nutmeg), juice them or convert them into a smoothie. Grapefruit can also be a tangy addition to a salad or salsa. 

Lemons

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Lemons are an excellent source of vitamin C, B6 and dietary fibre.
SELECTING // When selecting lemons choose fruit that is glossy, yellow and firm.
STORING // Store at room temperature or in the refrigerator.
AVAILABLE AT // Wetherill Park,Leichhardt,Penrith
PREPARING // Rinse lemons before slicing or zesting. If zest is required, use a fine grater, vegetable peeler or zester to remove the yellow skin (take care to avoid the bitter white pith). If juicing, roll lemons firmly on a bench top first - this helps to relax the cell walls, causing lemons to yield more juice.

Mandarins

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Mandarins are a fantastic source of vitamin C and are also a solid source of folate and fibre. The imperial mandarin is also a good source of vitamin A.
SELECTING // Look for mandarins that are heavy for their size with a glossy skin free of cuts, blemishes, soft spots or mold.
STORING // Mandarins can be kept in a dark, cool place for up to a week, or in the crisper section of the fridge for up to two weeks.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Mandarins can be peeled and juiced, or segmented and eaten like oranges. Seeds should be removed if using in cooking.

Mandarins; Honey Murcott

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Mandarins are a fantastic source of vitamin C and are also a solid source of folate and fibre.
SELECTING // Select mandarins that are heavy for their size with a glossy skin free of cuts, blemishes, soft spots or mold.
STORING // Mandarins can be kept in a dark, cool place for up to a week, or in the crisper section of the fridge for up to two weeks.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Mandarins can be peeled and juiced, or segmented and eaten like oranges. Seeds should be removed if using in cooking.

Melons

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Melons are about 90% water so they are great at helping to keep you hydrated. They also contain vitamin C, potassium and fibre.
SELECTING // Pick a heavy melon that shows a clean break from its stem as ripe melons separate easily from their vine.
STORING // If eating within one or two days, store melons at room temperature, otherwise, store in the fridge. If cut open, seal tightly so it doesn't absorb odours.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Slice melon. If melon contains a seed cavity, scoop out seeds. Melons are best eaten at room temperature as the cool dulls their flavour.

Oranges; Navel

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Oranges are a fantastic source of vitamin C. Navel oranges also a good source of folate and fibre.
SELECTING // When selecting, make sure the navel orange is firm and glossy.
STORING // Oranges store longest in the fridge.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Navels are the best oranges for eating and also combine well with duck, pork, chicken and ham.

Oranges; Seville

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Oranges are a great source of vitamin C. They are also a good source of folate and fibre.
SELECTING // Select fruit that is firm, unblemished, and feels heavy for its size.
STORING // Store oranges at room temperature or in the fridge for up to two weeks.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Seville oranges are fantastic for making your own homemade marmalade.

Papaw

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Papaw is an excellent source of vitamin C and a good source of vitamin A and folate.
SELECTING // Look for smooth-skinned pawpaw, with no blemishes or splits in skin.
STORING // Store pawpaw in a single layer at room temperature, out of direct sunlight, until they yield to gently pressure when cradled in your hand. Once at this stage, store in the fridge for 2 to 3 days.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Cut in half lengthways and scoop out seeds then either cut into wedges or peel away the skin before slicing as required.

Passionfruit

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Passionfruit are an excellent source of dietary fibre, vitamin C and vitamin B3.
SELECTING // Purchase passionfruit that are heavy for their size without any soft patches.
STORING // You can store passionfruit at room temperature for up to two weeks or in a plastic bag in the fridge for up to four weeks.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Cut passionfruit in half and spoon out pulp and seeds.

Pears; Nashi

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Pears are full of fibre, folate and vitamin C. They are also low GI.
SELECTING // Select pairs that are firm with no wrinkles.
STORING // Pears can be stored at room temperature for up to four days once ripe or stored in the fridge for up to two weeks.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Skin and flesh are eaten with stem and seeds usually discarded.

Persimmons

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Persimmons are a solid source of vitamin C, vitamin A and dietary fibre.
SELECTING // Look for firm, shiny fruit, with evenly coloured orange skin.
STORING // Ripen persimmons at room temperature then store in the fridge.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Use fresh slices in salads, to accompany pork, lamb or chicken, to make ice-cream, jams, purees and cakes.

Raspberries

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Raspberries are high in dietary fibre and vitamin C.
SELECTING // Visually check raspberries are bright red, firm, not squished, no visual signs of mould growing and no seeping juices in punnet.
STORING // Berries are very perishable. Store in the fridge for up to two days before consuming. Can be stored in the freezer for up to 12 months.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Allow raspberries to come to room temperature before consuming. Raspberries can be eaten straight from the punnet. Alternatively, they can be washed gently with water first.

Rhubarb

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Rhubarb is a good source of vitamin C, dietary fibre and potassium, a useful source of vitamin B1 and contains some vitamin B3.
SELECTING // When selecting rhubarb, look for glossy, firm, crisp stalks and fresh looking leaves.
STORING // Cover with plastic wrap and store in the refrigerator.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Only eat the stems of rhubarb, don’t eat the leaves – they’re highly poisonous as they contain a toxin known as oxalate, which is poisonous to humans.

Tamarillo

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Tamarillo’s are a good source of vitamin C, dietary fibre and potassium.
SELECTING // Select tamarillos with smooth, glossy skin. They should be firm with no wrinkled patches.
STORING // Store tamarillos at room temperature until they are still firm but just yield to the touch. Once at this stage, store in the fridge for up to 10 days.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Skin is inedible so discard and eat flesh.

Tangelos

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Tangelos are an excellent source of vitamin C, a good source of dietary fibre and contain some vitamin A and folic acid.
SELECTING // Select tangelos with good colour, reasonably firm skins, heavy for their size to indicate good juice content, and free from blemishes.
STORING // Store in the refrigerator crisper for a short time.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Enjoy as a fresh fruit, juice for a refreshing beverage or use segments in salads.

Cumquat

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Cumquats are an excellent source of vitamin C and a good source of dietary fibre.
SELECTING // Select rich orange, glossy fruit with no soft spots or signs of deterioration.
STORING // Ripen at room temperature and store in the refrigerator crisper for a short time.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Preserves in sugar syrup, brandy or in marmalades. Serve with pork and chicken dishes. The rind can be used for recipes containing citrus peel.

Custard Apples

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Custard apples are a good source of dietary fibre and vitamin C. They are also a handy source of vitamin B2, vitamin B6, magnesium, potassium and complex carbohydrates.
SELECTING // Select evenly coloured fruit, which can also have brown tinged ridges.
STORING // Custard apples ripen best at room temperature. For longer storage, they keep in the fridge.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Custard apples can only be eaten when fully ripe. Cut and scoop out the flesh for consumption.

Grapefruit

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Grapefruit is an excellent source of vitamins B5 and C and a good source of dietary fibre and potassium.
SELECTING // The best way to judge fruit quality is to hold it: the heavier it is in proportion to its size, the more juice it contains. Small surface bruises or blemishes do not reduce the flavour or quality of the fruit.
STORING // Store in the refrigerator crisper.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Eat the flesh whole (can sprinkle some honey or maple syrup to sweeten them, or add cinnamon and nutmeg), juice them or convert them into a smoothie. Grapefruit can also be a tangy addition to a salad or salsa. 

Lemons

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Lemons are an excellent source of vitamin C, B6 and dietary fibre.
SELECTING // When selecting lemons choose fruit that is glossy, yellow and firm.
STORING // Store at room temperature or in the refrigerator.
AVAILABLE AT // Wetherill Park,Leichhardt,Penrith
PREPARING // Rinse lemons before slicing or zesting. If zest is required, use a fine grater, vegetable peeler or zester to remove the yellow skin (take care to avoid the bitter white pith). If juicing, roll lemons firmly on a bench top first - this helps to relax the cell walls, causing lemons to yield more juice.

Mandarins

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Mandarins are a fantastic source of vitamin C and are also a solid source of folate and fibre. The imperial mandarin is also a good source of vitamin A.
SELECTING // Look for mandarins that are heavy for their size with a glossy skin free of cuts, blemishes, soft spots or mold.
STORING // Mandarins can be kept in a dark, cool place for up to a week, or in the crisper section of the fridge for up to two weeks.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Mandarins can be peeled and juiced, or segmented and eaten like oranges. Seeds should be removed if using in cooking.

Mandarins; Honey Murcott

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Mandarins are a fantastic source of vitamin C and are also a solid source of folate and fibre.
SELECTING // Select mandarins that are heavy for their size with a glossy skin free of cuts, blemishes, soft spots or mold.
STORING // Mandarins can be kept in a dark, cool place for up to a week, or in the crisper section of the fridge for up to two weeks.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Mandarins can be peeled and juiced, or segmented and eaten like oranges. Seeds should be removed if using in cooking.

Melons

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Melons are about 90% water so they are great at helping to keep you hydrated. They also contain vitamin C, potassium and fibre.
SELECTING // Pick a heavy melon that shows a clean break from its stem as ripe melons separate easily from their vine.
STORING // If eating within one or two days, store melons at room temperature, otherwise, store in the fridge. If cut open, seal tightly so it doesn't absorb odours.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Slice melon. If melon contains a seed cavity, scoop out seeds. Melons are best eaten at room temperature as the cool dulls their flavour.

Oranges; Navel

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Oranges are a fantastic source of vitamin C. Navel oranges also a good source of folate and fibre.
SELECTING // When selecting, make sure the navel orange is firm and glossy.
STORING // Oranges store longest in the fridge.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Navels are the best oranges for eating and also combine well with duck, pork, chicken and ham.

Oranges; Seville

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Oranges are a great source of vitamin C. They are also a good source of folate and fibre.
SELECTING // Select fruit that is firm, unblemished, and feels heavy for its size.
STORING // Store oranges at room temperature or in the fridge for up to two weeks.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Seville oranges are fantastic for making your own homemade marmalade.

Papaw

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Papaw is an excellent source of vitamin C and a good source of vitamin A and folate.
SELECTING // Look for smooth-skinned pawpaw, with no blemishes or splits in skin.
STORING // Store pawpaw in a single layer at room temperature, out of direct sunlight, until they yield to gently pressure when cradled in your hand. Once at this stage, store in the fridge for 2 to 3 days.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Cut in half lengthways and scoop out seeds then either cut into wedges or peel away the skin before slicing as required.

Passionfruit

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Passionfruit are an excellent source of dietary fibre, vitamin C and vitamin B3.
SELECTING // Purchase passionfruit that are heavy for their size without any soft patches.
STORING // You can store passionfruit at room temperature for up to two weeks or in a plastic bag in the fridge for up to four weeks.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Cut passionfruit in half and spoon out pulp and seeds.

Pears; Nashi

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Pears are full of fibre, folate and vitamin C. They are also low GI.
SELECTING // Select pairs that are firm with no wrinkles.
STORING // Pears can be stored at room temperature for up to four days once ripe or stored in the fridge for up to two weeks.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Skin and flesh are eaten with stem and seeds usually discarded.

Persimmons

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Persimmons are a solid source of vitamin C, vitamin A and dietary fibre.
SELECTING // Look for firm, shiny fruit, with evenly coloured orange skin.
STORING // Ripen persimmons at room temperature then store in the fridge.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Use fresh slices in salads, to accompany pork, lamb or chicken, to make ice-cream, jams, purees and cakes.

Raspberries

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Raspberries are high in dietary fibre and vitamin C.
SELECTING // Visually check raspberries are bright red, firm, not squished, no visual signs of mould growing and no seeping juices in punnet.
STORING // Berries are very perishable. Store in the fridge for up to two days before consuming. Can be stored in the freezer for up to 12 months.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Allow raspberries to come to room temperature before consuming. Raspberries can be eaten straight from the punnet. Alternatively, they can be washed gently with water first.

Rhubarb

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Rhubarb is a good source of vitamin C, dietary fibre and potassium, a useful source of vitamin B1 and contains some vitamin B3.
SELECTING // When selecting rhubarb, look for glossy, firm, crisp stalks and fresh looking leaves.
STORING // Cover with plastic wrap and store in the refrigerator.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Only eat the stems of rhubarb, don’t eat the leaves – they’re highly poisonous as they contain a toxin known as oxalate, which is poisonous to humans.

Tamarillo

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Tamarillo’s are a good source of vitamin C, dietary fibre and potassium.
SELECTING // Select tamarillos with smooth, glossy skin. They should be firm with no wrinkled patches.
STORING // Store tamarillos at room temperature until they are still firm but just yield to the touch. Once at this stage, store in the fridge for up to 10 days.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Skin is inedible so discard and eat flesh.

Tangelos

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Tangelos are an excellent source of vitamin C, a good source of dietary fibre and contain some vitamin A and folic acid.
SELECTING // Select tangelos with good colour, reasonably firm skins, heavy for their size to indicate good juice content, and free from blemishes.
STORING // Store in the refrigerator crisper for a short time.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Enjoy as a fresh fruit, juice for a refreshing beverage or use segments in salads.

Cumquat

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Cumquats are an excellent source of vitamin C and a good source of dietary fibre.
SELECTING // Select rich orange, glossy fruit with no soft spots or signs of deterioration.
STORING // Ripen at room temperature and store in the refrigerator crisper for a short time.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Preserves in sugar syrup, brandy or in marmalades. Serve with pork and chicken dishes. The rind can be used for recipes containing citrus peel.

Custard Apples

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Custard apples are a good source of dietary fibre and vitamin C. They are also a handy source of vitamin B2, vitamin B6, magnesium, potassium and complex carbohydrates.
SELECTING // Select evenly coloured fruit, which can also have brown tinged ridges.
STORING // Custard apples ripen best at room temperature. For longer storage, they keep in the fridge.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Custard apples can only be eaten when fully ripe. Cut and scoop out the flesh for consumption.

Grapefruit

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Grapefruit is an excellent source of vitamins B5 and C and a good source of dietary fibre and potassium.
SELECTING // The best way to judge fruit quality is to hold it: the heavier it is in proportion to its size, the more juice it contains. Small surface bruises or blemishes do not reduce the flavour or quality of the fruit.
STORING // Store in the refrigerator crisper.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Eat the flesh whole (can sprinkle some honey or maple syrup to sweeten them, or add cinnamon and nutmeg), juice them or convert them into a smoothie. Grapefruit can also be a tangy addition to a salad or salsa. 

Lemons

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Lemons are an excellent source of vitamin C, B6 and dietary fibre.
SELECTING // When selecting lemons choose fruit that is glossy, yellow and firm.
STORING // Store at room temperature or in the refrigerator.
AVAILABLE AT // Wetherill Park,Leichhardt,Penrith
PREPARING // Rinse lemons before slicing or zesting. If zest is required, use a fine grater, vegetable peeler or zester to remove the yellow skin (take care to avoid the bitter white pith). If juicing, roll lemons firmly on a bench top first - this helps to relax the cell walls, causing lemons to yield more juice.

Limes

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Limes are packed full of vitamin C.
SELECTING // Choose limes that are glossy green with a smooth skin and are nice and heavy. The heaviness is an indication of lots of juice.
STORING // Store limes in the fridge.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Bring limes to room temperature before using to get more juice out of them.

Mandarins; Honey Murcott

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Mandarins are a fantastic source of vitamin C and are also a solid source of folate and fibre.
SELECTING // Select mandarins that are heavy for their size with a glossy skin free of cuts, blemishes, soft spots or mold.
STORING // Mandarins can be kept in a dark, cool place for up to a week, or in the crisper section of the fridge for up to two weeks.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Mandarins can be peeled and juiced, or segmented and eaten like oranges. Seeds should be removed if using in cooking.

Melons

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Melons are about 90% water so they are great at helping to keep you hydrated. They also contain vitamin C, potassium and fibre.
SELECTING // Pick a heavy melon that shows a clean break from its stem as ripe melons separate easily from their vine.
STORING // If eating within one or two days, store melons at room temperature, otherwise, store in the fridge. If cut open, seal tightly so it doesn't absorb odours.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Slice melon. If melon contains a seed cavity, scoop out seeds. Melons are best eaten at room temperature as the cool dulls their flavour.

Oranges; Navel

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Oranges are a fantastic source of vitamin C. Navel oranges also a good source of folate and fibre.
SELECTING // When selecting, make sure the navel orange is firm and glossy.
STORING // Oranges store longest in the fridge.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Navels are the best oranges for eating and also combine well with duck, pork, chicken and ham.

Oranges; Seville

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Oranges are a great source of vitamin C. They are also a good source of folate and fibre.
SELECTING // Select fruit that is firm, unblemished, and feels heavy for its size.
STORING // Store oranges at room temperature or in the fridge for up to two weeks.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Seville oranges are fantastic for making your own homemade marmalade.

Papaw

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Papaw is an excellent source of vitamin C and a good source of vitamin A and folate.
SELECTING // Look for smooth-skinned pawpaw, with no blemishes or splits in skin.
STORING // Store pawpaw in a single layer at room temperature, out of direct sunlight, until they yield to gently pressure when cradled in your hand. Once at this stage, store in the fridge for 2 to 3 days.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Cut in half lengthways and scoop out seeds then either cut into wedges or peel away the skin before slicing as required.

Passionfruit

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Passionfruit are an excellent source of dietary fibre, vitamin C and vitamin B3.
SELECTING // Purchase passionfruit that are heavy for their size without any soft patches.
STORING // You can store passionfruit at room temperature for up to two weeks or in a plastic bag in the fridge for up to four weeks.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Cut passionfruit in half and spoon out pulp and seeds.

Pears; Nashi

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Pears are full of fibre, folate and vitamin C. They are also low GI.
SELECTING // Select pairs that are firm with no wrinkles.
STORING // Pears can be stored at room temperature for up to four days once ripe or stored in the fridge for up to two weeks.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Skin and flesh are eaten with stem and seeds usually discarded.

Persimmons

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Persimmons are a solid source of vitamin C, vitamin A and dietary fibre.
SELECTING // Look for firm, shiny fruit, with evenly coloured orange skin.
STORING // Ripen persimmons at room temperature then store in the fridge.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Use fresh slices in salads, to accompany pork, lamb or chicken, to make ice-cream, jams, purees and cakes.

Raspberries

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Raspberries are high in dietary fibre and vitamin C.
SELECTING // Visually check raspberries are bright red, firm, not squished, no visual signs of mould growing and no seeping juices in punnet.
STORING // Berries are very perishable. Store in the fridge for up to two days before consuming. Can be stored in the freezer for up to 12 months.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Allow raspberries to come to room temperature before consuming. Raspberries can be eaten straight from the punnet. Alternatively, they can be washed gently with water first.

Rhubarb

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Rhubarb is a good source of vitamin C, dietary fibre and potassium, a useful source of vitamin B1 and contains some vitamin B3.
SELECTING // When selecting rhubarb, look for glossy, firm, crisp stalks and fresh looking leaves.
STORING // Cover with plastic wrap and store in the refrigerator.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Only eat the stems of rhubarb, don’t eat the leaves – they’re highly poisonous as they contain a toxin known as oxalate, which is poisonous to humans.

Tamarillo

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Tamarillo’s are a good source of vitamin C, dietary fibre and potassium.
SELECTING // Select tamarillos with smooth, glossy skin. They should be firm with no wrinkled patches.
STORING // Store tamarillos at room temperature until they are still firm but just yield to the touch. Once at this stage, store in the fridge for up to 10 days.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Skin is inedible so discard and eat flesh.

Tangelos

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Tangelos are an excellent source of vitamin C, a good source of dietary fibre and contain some vitamin A and folic acid.
SELECTING // Select tangelos with good colour, reasonably firm skins, heavy for their size to indicate good juice content, and free from blemishes.
STORING // Store in the refrigerator crisper for a short time.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Enjoy as a fresh fruit, juice for a refreshing beverage or use segments in salads.

Grapefruit

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Grapefruit is an excellent source of vitamins B5 and C and a good source of dietary fibre and potassium.
SELECTING // The best way to judge fruit quality is to hold it: the heavier it is in proportion to its size, the more juice it contains. Small surface bruises or blemishes do not reduce the flavour or quality of the fruit.
STORING // Store in the refrigerator crisper.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Eat the flesh whole (can sprinkle some honey or maple syrup to sweeten them, or add cinnamon and nutmeg), juice them or convert them into a smoothie. Grapefruit can also be a tangy addition to a salad or salsa. 

Lemons

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Lemons are an excellent source of vitamin C, B6 and dietary fibre.
SELECTING // When selecting lemons choose fruit that is glossy, yellow and firm.
STORING // Store at room temperature or in the refrigerator.
AVAILABLE AT // Wetherill Park,Leichhardt,Penrith
PREPARING // Rinse lemons before slicing or zesting. If zest is required, use a fine grater, vegetable peeler or zester to remove the yellow skin (take care to avoid the bitter white pith). If juicing, roll lemons firmly on a bench top first - this helps to relax the cell walls, causing lemons to yield more juice.

Limes

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Limes are packed full of vitamin C.
SELECTING // Choose limes that are glossy green with a smooth skin and are nice and heavy. The heaviness is an indication of lots of juice.
STORING // Store limes in the fridge.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Bring limes to room temperature before using to get more juice out of them.

Mandarins; Honey Murcott

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Mandarins are a fantastic source of vitamin C and are also a solid source of folate and fibre.
SELECTING // Select mandarins that are heavy for their size with a glossy skin free of cuts, blemishes, soft spots or mold.
STORING // Mandarins can be kept in a dark, cool place for up to a week, or in the crisper section of the fridge for up to two weeks.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Mandarins can be peeled and juiced, or segmented and eaten like oranges. Seeds should be removed if using in cooking.

Melons

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Melons are about 90% water so they are great at helping to keep you hydrated. They also contain vitamin C, potassium and fibre.
SELECTING // Pick a heavy melon that shows a clean break from its stem as ripe melons separate easily from their vine.
STORING // If eating within one or two days, store melons at room temperature, otherwise, store in the fridge. If cut open, seal tightly so it doesn't absorb odours.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Slice melon. If melon contains a seed cavity, scoop out seeds. Melons are best eaten at room temperature as the cool dulls their flavour.

Oranges; Navel

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Oranges are a fantastic source of vitamin C. Navel oranges also a good source of folate and fibre.
SELECTING // When selecting, make sure the navel orange is firm and glossy.
STORING // Oranges store longest in the fridge.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Navels are the best oranges for eating and also combine well with duck, pork, chicken and ham.

Oranges; Seville

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Oranges are a great source of vitamin C. They are also a good source of folate and fibre.
SELECTING // Select fruit that is firm, unblemished, and feels heavy for its size.
STORING // Store oranges at room temperature or in the fridge for up to two weeks.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Seville oranges are fantastic for making your own homemade marmalade.

Papaw

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Papaw is an excellent source of vitamin C and a good source of vitamin A and folate.
SELECTING // Look for smooth-skinned pawpaw, with no blemishes or splits in skin.
STORING // Store pawpaw in a single layer at room temperature, out of direct sunlight, until they yield to gently pressure when cradled in your hand. Once at this stage, store in the fridge for 2 to 3 days.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Cut in half lengthways and scoop out seeds then either cut into wedges or peel away the skin before slicing as required.

Passionfruit

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Passionfruit are an excellent source of dietary fibre, vitamin C and vitamin B3.
SELECTING // Purchase passionfruit that are heavy for their size without any soft patches.
STORING // You can store passionfruit at room temperature for up to two weeks or in a plastic bag in the fridge for up to four weeks.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Cut passionfruit in half and spoon out pulp and seeds.

Pears; Nashi

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Pears are full of fibre, folate and vitamin C. They are also low GI.
SELECTING // Select pairs that are firm with no wrinkles.
STORING // Pears can be stored at room temperature for up to four days once ripe or stored in the fridge for up to two weeks.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Skin and flesh are eaten with stem and seeds usually discarded.

Persimmons

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Persimmons are a solid source of vitamin C, vitamin A and dietary fibre.
SELECTING // Look for firm, shiny fruit, with evenly coloured orange skin.
STORING // Ripen persimmons at room temperature then store in the fridge.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Use fresh slices in salads, to accompany pork, lamb or chicken, to make ice-cream, jams, purees and cakes.

Pomelo

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Pomelos are a good source of vitamin C.
SELECTING // Look for pomelo with firm, even-coloured yellow skin.
STORING // Store pomelo at room temperature, out of direct sunlight, for up to one week. Alternatively, store in the fridge for up to 10 days.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Peel away the thick skin and white pith then divide fruit into segments, removing the membrane from each segment. Alternatively, cut fruit in half then squeeze to extract juice.

Raspberries

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Raspberries are high in dietary fibre and vitamin C.
SELECTING // Visually check raspberries are bright red, firm, not squished, no visual signs of mould growing and no seeping juices in punnet.
STORING // Berries are very perishable. Store in the fridge for up to two days before consuming. Can be stored in the freezer for up to 12 months.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Allow raspberries to come to room temperature before consuming. Raspberries can be eaten straight from the punnet. Alternatively, they can be washed gently with water first.

Rhubarb

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Rhubarb is a good source of vitamin C, dietary fibre and potassium, a useful source of vitamin B1 and contains some vitamin B3.
SELECTING // When selecting rhubarb, look for glossy, firm, crisp stalks and fresh looking leaves.
STORING // Cover with plastic wrap and store in the refrigerator.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Only eat the stems of rhubarb, don’t eat the leaves – they’re highly poisonous as they contain a toxin known as oxalate, which is poisonous to humans.

Tamarillo

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Tamarillo’s are a good source of vitamin C, dietary fibre and potassium.
SELECTING // Select tamarillos with smooth, glossy skin. They should be firm with no wrinkled patches.
STORING // Store tamarillos at room temperature until they are still firm but just yield to the touch. Once at this stage, store in the fridge for up to 10 days.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Skin is inedible so discard and eat flesh.

Tangelos

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Tangelos are an excellent source of vitamin C, a good source of dietary fibre and contain some vitamin A and folic acid.
SELECTING // Select tangelos with good colour, reasonably firm skins, heavy for their size to indicate good juice content, and free from blemishes.
STORING // Store in the refrigerator crisper for a short time.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Enjoy as a fresh fruit, juice for a refreshing beverage or use segments in salads.

Currants; Red and White

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Currants are a good source of potassium, manganese, dietary fibre and vitamins C and K.
SELECTING // Select currants that are plump, small and shiny.
STORING // More delicate than other currants, red and white currants don’t store well so should be used as soon as possible. Strip off the stalk just before use.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Currants are quite sour, so mostly used in cooking, jams and sauces although white currants are slightly sweeter.

Grapefruit

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Grapefruit is an excellent source of vitamins B5 and C and a good source of dietary fibre and potassium.
SELECTING // The best way to judge fruit quality is to hold it: the heavier it is in proportion to its size, the more juice it contains. Small surface bruises or blemishes do not reduce the flavour or quality of the fruit.
STORING // Store in the refrigerator crisper.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Eat the flesh whole (can sprinkle some honey or maple syrup to sweeten them, or add cinnamon and nutmeg), juice them or convert them into a smoothie. Grapefruit can also be a tangy addition to a salad or salsa. 

Limes

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Limes are packed full of vitamin C.
SELECTING // Choose limes that are glossy green with a smooth skin and are nice and heavy. The heaviness is an indication of lots of juice.
STORING // Store limes in the fridge.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Bring limes to room temperature before using to get more juice out of them.

Melons

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Melons are about 90% water so they are great at helping to keep you hydrated. They also contain vitamin C, potassium and fibre.
SELECTING // Pick a heavy melon that shows a clean break from its stem as ripe melons separate easily from their vine.
STORING // If eating within one or two days, store melons at room temperature, otherwise, store in the fridge. If cut open, seal tightly so it doesn't absorb odours.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Slice melon. If melon contains a seed cavity, scoop out seeds. Melons are best eaten at room temperature as the cool dulls their flavour.

Nectarines

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Nectarines are a great source of vitamins A and C.
SELECTING // Choose nectarines that are fragrant, firm, plump and richly coloured with smooth, glossy skin. The fruit should yield slightly when gently pressed.
STORING // To ripen fruit, store it at room temperature out of direct sunlight. Ripe fruit should be stored in the fridge for three to five days.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // The flesh and skin of the nectarine are consumed. Early season varieties have a seed that clings to the flesh, later season varieties separate from the flesh easily. Nectarines taste best consumed at room temperature.

Oranges; Navel

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Oranges are a fantastic source of vitamin C. Navel oranges also a good source of folate and fibre.
SELECTING // When selecting, make sure the navel orange is firm and glossy.
STORING // Oranges store longest in the fridge.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Navels are the best oranges for eating and also combine well with duck, pork, chicken and ham.

Papaw

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Papaw is an excellent source of vitamin C and a good source of vitamin A and folate.
SELECTING // Look for smooth-skinned pawpaw, with no blemishes or splits in skin.
STORING // Store pawpaw in a single layer at room temperature, out of direct sunlight, until they yield to gently pressure when cradled in your hand. Once at this stage, store in the fridge for 2 to 3 days.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Cut in half lengthways and scoop out seeds then either cut into wedges or peel away the skin before slicing as required.

Passionfruit

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Passionfruit are an excellent source of dietary fibre, vitamin C and vitamin B3.
SELECTING // Purchase passionfruit that are heavy for their size without any soft patches.
STORING // You can store passionfruit at room temperature for up to two weeks or in a plastic bag in the fridge for up to four weeks.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Cut passionfruit in half and spoon out pulp and seeds.

Persimmons

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Persimmons are a solid source of vitamin C, vitamin A and dietary fibre.
SELECTING // Look for firm, shiny fruit, with evenly coloured orange skin.
STORING // Ripen persimmons at room temperature then store in the fridge.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Use fresh slices in salads, to accompany pork, lamb or chicken, to make ice-cream, jams, purees and cakes.

Pomelo

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Pomelos are a good source of vitamin C.
SELECTING // Look for pomelo with firm, even-coloured yellow skin.
STORING // Store pomelo at room temperature, out of direct sunlight, for up to one week. Alternatively, store in the fridge for up to 10 days.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Peel away the thick skin and white pith then divide fruit into segments, removing the membrane from each segment. Alternatively, cut fruit in half then squeeze to extract juice.

Raspberries

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Raspberries are high in dietary fibre and vitamin C.
SELECTING // Visually check raspberries are bright red, firm, not squished, no visual signs of mould growing and no seeping juices in punnet.
STORING // Berries are very perishable. Store in the fridge for up to two days before consuming. Can be stored in the freezer for up to 12 months.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Allow raspberries to come to room temperature before consuming. Raspberries can be eaten straight from the punnet. Alternatively, they can be washed gently with water first.

Rhubarb

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Rhubarb is a good source of vitamin C, dietary fibre and potassium, a useful source of vitamin B1 and contains some vitamin B3.
SELECTING // When selecting rhubarb, look for glossy, firm, crisp stalks and fresh looking leaves.
STORING // Cover with plastic wrap and store in the refrigerator.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Only eat the stems of rhubarb, don’t eat the leaves – they’re highly poisonous as they contain a toxin known as oxalate, which is poisonous to humans.

Tamarillo

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Tamarillo’s are a good source of vitamin C, dietary fibre and potassium.
SELECTING // Select tamarillos with smooth, glossy skin. They should be firm with no wrinkled patches.
STORING // Store tamarillos at room temperature until they are still firm but just yield to the touch. Once at this stage, store in the fridge for up to 10 days.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Skin is inedible so discard and eat flesh.

Blackberries

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Blackberries are high in Vitamin C and dietary fibre.
SELECTING // Select deep-coloured blackberries, these will have a more intense flavour. If using blackberries to make jam, you may want to try to find some slightly under-ripe berries, as these contain more pectin, which helps jam to set.
STORING // Blackberries should ideally be used as soon as possible after purchasing. Once home, remove from punnet and transfer to a paper towel-lined plate. Cover with plastic wrap and store in the fridge until ready to eat or cook with.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Blackberries don’t require any preparation. If they have been in the fridge, remove 30 minutes before using as their flavour is best when they are at room temperature.

Currants; Red and White

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Currants are a good source of potassium, manganese, dietary fibre and vitamins C and K.
SELECTING // Select currants that are plump, small and shiny.
STORING // More delicate than other currants, red and white currants don’t store well so should be used as soon as possible. Strip off the stalk just before use.
AVAILABLE AT //
PREPARING // Currants are quite sour, so mostly used in cooking, jams and sauces although white currants are slightly sweeter.

Figs

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Figs are a good source of dietary fibre, vitamin C, sodium and calcium.
SELECTING // Pick figs with a nice smooth skin. Avoid figs with a sour aroma or sticky appearance.
STORING // Place them in an airtight plastic bag in the fridge but don't store them for more than two to five days or you'll notice a decrease in their taste and texture.
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PREPARING // If storing in the fridge, bring figs to room temperature. Wash figs and gently pat dry. Remove stem. Figs can be eaten raw, skin and all.

Grapefruit

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Grapefruit is an excellent source of vitamins B5 and C and a good source of dietary fibre and potassium.
SELECTING // The best way to judge fruit quality is to hold it: the heavier it is in proportion to its size, the more juice it contains. Small surface bruises or blemishes do not reduce the flavour or quality of the fruit.
STORING // Store in the refrigerator crisper.
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PREPARING // Eat the flesh whole (can sprinkle some honey or maple syrup to sweeten them, or add cinnamon and nutmeg), juice them or convert them into a smoothie. Grapefruit can also be a tangy addition to a salad or salsa. 

Limes

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WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Limes are packed full of vitamin C.
SELECTING // Choose limes that are glossy green with a smooth skin and are nice and heavy. The heaviness is an indication of lots of juice.
STORING // Store limes in the fridge.
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PREPARING // Bring limes to room temperature before using to get more juice out of them.

Melons

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Melons are about 90% water so they are great at helping to keep you hydrated. They also contain vitamin C, potassium and fibre.
SELECTING // Pick a heavy melon that shows a clean break from its stem as ripe melons separate easily from their vine.
STORING // If eating within one or two days, store melons at room temperature, otherwise, store in the fridge. If cut open, seal tightly so it doesn't absorb odours.
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PREPARING // Slice melon. If melon contains a seed cavity, scoop out seeds. Melons are best eaten at room temperature as the cool dulls their flavour.

Nectarines

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WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Nectarines are a great source of vitamins A and C.
SELECTING // Choose nectarines that are fragrant, firm, plump and richly coloured with smooth, glossy skin. The fruit should yield slightly when gently pressed.
STORING // To ripen fruit, store it at room temperature out of direct sunlight. Ripe fruit should be stored in the fridge for three to five days.
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PREPARING // The flesh and skin of the nectarine are consumed. Early season varieties have a seed that clings to the flesh, later season varieties separate from the flesh easily. Nectarines taste best consumed at room temperature.

Papaw

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WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Papaw is an excellent source of vitamin C and a good source of vitamin A and folate.
SELECTING // Look for smooth-skinned pawpaw, with no blemishes or splits in skin.
STORING // Store pawpaw in a single layer at room temperature, out of direct sunlight, until they yield to gently pressure when cradled in your hand. Once at this stage, store in the fridge for 2 to 3 days.
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PREPARING // Cut in half lengthways and scoop out seeds then either cut into wedges or peel away the skin before slicing as required.

Passionfruit

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WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Passionfruit are an excellent source of dietary fibre, vitamin C and vitamin B3.
SELECTING // Purchase passionfruit that are heavy for their size without any soft patches.
STORING // You can store passionfruit at room temperature for up to two weeks or in a plastic bag in the fridge for up to four weeks.
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PREPARING // Cut passionfruit in half and spoon out pulp and seeds.

Persimmons

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Persimmons are a solid source of vitamin C, vitamin A and dietary fibre.
SELECTING // Look for firm, shiny fruit, with evenly coloured orange skin.
STORING // Ripen persimmons at room temperature then store in the fridge.
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PREPARING // Use fresh slices in salads, to accompany pork, lamb or chicken, to make ice-cream, jams, purees and cakes.

Pomelo

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WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Pomelos are a good source of vitamin C.
SELECTING // Look for pomelo with firm, even-coloured yellow skin.
STORING // Store pomelo at room temperature, out of direct sunlight, for up to one week. Alternatively, store in the fridge for up to 10 days.
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PREPARING // Peel away the thick skin and white pith then divide fruit into segments, removing the membrane from each segment. Alternatively, cut fruit in half then squeeze to extract juice.

Rambutans

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WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Rambutans are a great source of vitamin C and dietary fibre.
SELECTING // Pick rambutans that are an even red or yellow (depending on variety), ensure spines are firm and fruit is free from wrinkles or soft spots.
STORING // Rambutans store best in an air tight container in the fridge.
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PREPARING // To peel rambutans, use a small, sharp knife to cut around the centre of the skin. Gently pull the skin from both ends to remove. Rambutan contain a single seed.

Raspberries

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Raspberries are high in dietary fibre and vitamin C.
SELECTING // Visually check raspberries are bright red, firm, not squished, no visual signs of mould growing and no seeping juices in punnet.
STORING // Berries are very perishable. Store in the fridge for up to two days before consuming. Can be stored in the freezer for up to 12 months.
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PREPARING // Allow raspberries to come to room temperature before consuming. Raspberries can be eaten straight from the punnet. Alternatively, they can be washed gently with water first.

Rhubarb

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Rhubarb is a good source of vitamin C, dietary fibre and potassium, a useful source of vitamin B1 and contains some vitamin B3.
SELECTING // When selecting rhubarb, look for glossy, firm, crisp stalks and fresh looking leaves.
STORING // Cover with plastic wrap and store in the refrigerator.
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PREPARING // Only eat the stems of rhubarb, don’t eat the leaves – they’re highly poisonous as they contain a toxin known as oxalate, which is poisonous to humans.

Tamarillo

J F M A M J J A S O N D
                       
WHY THEY'RE SO GOOD // Tamarillo’s are a good source of vitamin C, dietary fibre and potassium.
SELECTING // Select tamarillos with smooth, glossy skin. They should be firm with no wrinkled patches.
STORING // Store tamarillos at room temperature until they are still firm but just yield to the touch. Once at this stage, store in the fridge for up to 10 days.
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PREPARING // Skin is inedible so discard and eat flesh.